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Author Topic: Any Recipes for tasty potatoes?  (Read 2654 times)
Michelle2016
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« on: April 28, 2017, 01:10:16 PM »

I love potatoes. I'd like to know how to make tasty potatoes.

Thanks.
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #1 on: April 28, 2017, 06:01:50 PM »


There is lots of talk of twice boiling potatoes to leach out more potassium.  I haven't tried it yet.

I like the little bitty reds and whites mixed in with sauerkraut and polish.  I cheat some, adding baby carrots to sweeten the mixture.  I've been know to hurry things up a lot by cooking the carrots covered in the microwave then add to the kraut on the stove.  Same with the spuds. I can have the whole thing done and on the table in about half the time.

I've also roasted potatoes.  Cut bite size, spread on a foil covered cookie sheet.  Drizzle with a bit of olive or your favorite oil.  Sprinkle a bit of garlic, lemon pepper, parsley and that red stuff, paprika, Roast under the broiler testing occasionally with a fork until desired 'Doneness'.  I've no idea how much potassium is in these.  Take you binders for the phosphorus.
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PrimeTimer
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« Reply #2 on: April 28, 2017, 09:38:33 PM »

I might try these as a side to a pot roast. Just remember to boil and rinse them for about 5 minutes -twice- to reduce the potassium. And watch your portion size. That is key.
     

Honey-Scallion Potatoes  Delicious  :P

Follow your red bliss…potatoes, baked until slightly crispy and then drizzled in a honey-scallion butter sauce. This side dish pairs perfectly with a beef, chicken, turkey or pork entrée.

: Serves 5 (1 serving = 3-ounce portion)
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Ingredients

    1 pound red bliss potatoes quartered and parboiled (or, if you have the time, quarter and soak overnight)
    3 tablespoons honey
    ¼ cup fresh scallions, chopped
    2 tablespoons fresh parsley, chopped
    ½ stick unsalted butter, cold and cubed
    2 tablespoons canola oil
    ½ teaspoon black pepper


Directions

Preheat oven to 400° F.

    Drain potatoes and dry thoroughly.
    Toss potatoes in oil so they are well coated and place on baking sheet tray.
    Bake for 15–20 minutes, turning midway to brown evenly on all sides.
    Place remaining ingredients (except butter) in medium-size bowl and microwave for 30 seconds.
    Remove bowl and whisk in butter until mixture is a syrupy consistency.
    Toss potatoes in bowl and mix until coated, then serve.

TIP: Boiling and rinsing potatoes, even for 5 minutes, can reduce the potassium level by one third.
"It’s a lifestyle—not a diet. You can eat out. You can go to a party. It’s doable!"


Nutrition Per Serving
Calories    234 cal
Total Fat    15 g
Saturated Fat    6 g
Trans Fat    0 g
Cholesterol    24 mg
Sodium    20 mg
Carbohydrates    25 g
Protein    2 g
Phosphorus    62 mg
Potassium    447 mg
Dietary Fiber    1.8 g
Calcium    19 mg

—Diana Croxton
Registered Dietitian, LD/N
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Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Michelle2016
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« Reply #3 on: June 08, 2017, 08:20:53 PM »

Thanks for the responses and receipts. I'm going to try them.

Take care.
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Whamo
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« Reply #4 on: March 30, 2018, 05:18:29 AM »

I love potatoes but I stopped eating them.  Once in awhile I'll eat a bite or two.  Why not?
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irvinsen5
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« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2018, 08:06:19 PM »

We make these amazing apple hashbrowns at home. I follow the recipe that's on here https://www.dietspotlight.com/low-carb-breakfast-recipes/ #21 Apple Hashbrowns (make swaps when needed).
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Paul
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That's another fine TARDIS you got me into Stanley

« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2018, 06:24:31 AM »

Here is a tip I got given by a nurse a few days ago. I have not tried it yet, so I cannot personally vouch for it, but it is on my "to do" list ("to eat" list):

The rules say we can only eat boiled, drained potatoes, so no fried potatoes. The tip I was given was: Cut and boil the potatoes first, then drain and fry them.

As I said I have not tried it, but my mother used to boil roast potatoes before roasting them (nothing to do with lowering potassium, apparently it makes them easier to roast), and if it works for roasties, guess it will work for fried potatoes too.
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2018, 06:38:50 AM »


Hey Paul, I sus pect your Mother figured out that boiling potatoes before roasting made for a much more moist potatoe rather than drying them out the way we normally just toss them into the pan and roast them.

Souonds like a great idea. Sort of like the huge difference in the size of french fries.  Those thin little sticks are way too dry compared to those big thick slices we find at some places.  I realy do like those wedges, dusted with stuff before cooking.  No fry can compare to good wedges.  Sadly I have to limit myself to just one or be too afraid my labs will prove it.
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Paul
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That's another fine TARDIS you got me into Stanley

« Reply #8 on: June 17, 2018, 07:30:14 AM »

Sort of like the huge difference in the size of french fries.  Those thin little sticks are way too dry compared to those big thick slices we find at some places.

In Britain fries are traditionally thick (think four french fries stuck together, two rows of two). It was only when McDonald's moved into the UK in the mid 1970s that we started to get french fries. Nowadays chicken and burger places mostly sell french fries, fried fish and kebab shops mostly sell the traditional, thick, fries.

Although we don't call them "fries", we call them "chips" which confuses the hell out of American tourists, because "chips" is what you call the things we call "crisps".

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Whoever said "God does not make mistakes" has obviously never seen the complete bog up he made of my kidneys!
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