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Author Topic: Early signs of Skin Cancer  (Read 515 times)
UkrainianTracksuit
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« Reply #25 on: June 22, 2020, 05:59:38 PM »

I have no idea what's Land's End so sorry to crash that party, but MM, could you care to elaborate? This is familiar and I thought it was just my out of control hormones. Might have to dig up the papers from a box of Avagraf.

To be fair, I am pretty sure my perspiration problems stem from my tacrolimus.  The patient information sheet that comes with it warns of this.
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Simon Dog
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« Reply #26 on: June 22, 2020, 06:32:02 PM »

I have no idea what's Land's End

1. The southwestern tip of mainland England (Cornwall county)  [with apostrophe]
2. A multi-national clothing store based in the US and owned by Sears Holdings [without apostrophe]
« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 06:33:33 PM by Simon Dog » Logged
iolaire
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« Reply #27 on: June 22, 2020, 06:38:11 PM »

My wife has taken to wearing a rash guard as sometime in the last 10 years she started being much more skin sensitive. We think doxycycline for malaria preventative caused it.  It feels like in the past couple of years rash guards became more popular and available.
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Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
MooseMom
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« Reply #28 on: June 22, 2020, 08:17:37 PM »

UT, I think I have been mistaken about the tacrolimus causing sweating.  I've just reviewed all of my medication notes, and it is the patient info on prednisone that lists "excessive sweating" as a possible side effect.

After my tx surgery, I remember telling one of the nurses that I felt really hot but that it was not a feverish hot, rather, it was just a sweaty hot.  She said, "Oh, that's the tac."  At the time, I didn't know what "tac" was, but for all of these years, I'd been thinking that was the culprit.  At least now I know!

Apologies for the misinformation on my part.
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"Eggs are so inadequate, don't you think?  I mean, they ought to be able to become anything, but instead you always get a chicken.  Or a duck.  Or whatever they're programmed to be.  You never get anything interesting, like regret, or the middle of last week."
kristina
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« Reply #29 on: June 25, 2020, 01:19:46 AM »

Hi Katrina.  Welcome back.  I'm glad that you decided to rejoin us. 

No, I don't have lupus, and I'm not a vampire.  My problem is that I have fair Irish skin.  The solution for it is simple: stay out of the sun. 

I know you like your little walks, which you have mentioned on previous posts.  But I am an inveterate runner.  There is nothing more exhilarating than high-intensity interval training, which really gets those endorphins flowing.  And it helps to have good running music.  I share with you your love for classical music, but when it come to running, I find myself more motivated by trance or house or EDM at 180 bpm.  On good days, I can run forever. 

Plus, I'm convinced that being a fitness buff has helped me ward off the worst effects of several illnesses, including sepsis and CKD.  When I can't run any more, I'll know that I am done.

Again, let me say that your absence was noticed, and that long-time members like you bring value to the site.

Hello enginist and many thanks for your kind reply and - if I may say so - I would like to mention, that - as a "Continental" I don't mind you calling me "Katrina" instead of my real name Kristina. But it has been pointed out to me that some of our American friends here mind very much if you call me "Katrina", because the name "Katrina" reminds them of Hurricane Katrina which, back in 2005, hit the US Gulf Coast and killed 1200 and cost about $125 billion in damage.
So, with respect to our American friends could you please call me by my real name to avoid any further distress?

I appreciate that you stay out of the sun because of your fair Irish skin and the only reason why I have mentioned SLE/MCTD/Lupus is because the symptoms you have described are almost identical to mine before I was diagnosed with SLE/MCTD. Because of that, I felt it my "human duty" to mention this because SLE/MCTD/Lupus is a very-hard-to-diagnose disease and, at the same time it is very deadly. In fact, it has been mentioned as the "Lady-killer", because nine out of ten patients happen to be female, but it also hits the male population very badly ...

The reason why I go for regular walks is because my kidneys first failed in the very early 1970's and, after their function recovered a little again, medics advised me to eat an easy digestible vegetarian diet and keep as fit as possible by going for "gentle walks". I was warned against any running because - according to the doctors at the time - running unnecessarily "wobbles" the kidneys up and down and since my injured kidneys were very fragile in their function etc., medics thought it a good idea to keep my kidneys as calm as is possible, especially because of my serious kidney-disease and to avoid deterioration for as long as is possible. Perhaps it was the right advise in my case, because, without dialysis I could keep my injured kidneys functioning - just about - for another 43 years.

Whatever you are going to decide, I wish you the best of luck and please check-up with your medics and I send my kind regards from Kristina. :grouphug;
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enginist
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« Reply #30 on: June 26, 2020, 12:25:24 PM »

I lived in New Orleans for seven years, and still often visit, so maybe I unconsciously switch the names.  I will make a sincere effort to refer to you as Kristina, a lovely name in its own right.  However, if some people here are complaining about a harmless slip of the tongue, they should be grateful that they don't have far worse problems to complain about. 

« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 12:49:32 PM by enginist » Logged
iolaire
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« Reply #31 on: June 26, 2020, 01:05:41 PM »

However, if some people here are complaining about a harmless slip of the tongue, they should be grateful that they don't have far worse problems to complain about.
Yesterday there was a funny post on the Facebook group starting out, "Have any of you fallen pregnant well on dialysis." The post was updated to clarify that falling pregnant was common English in south Africa for becoming pregnant!  Unfortunately she had to add the calcification because people automatically assumed her English language skills are bad or she had a slip of the tongue rather than that it might be a cultural difference.  Anyway that was a funny learning experience!
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Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
MooseMom
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« Reply #32 on: June 26, 2020, 01:50:02 PM »

I lived in New Orleans for seven years, and still often visit, so maybe I unconsciously switch the names.  I will make a sincere effort to refer to you as Kristina, a lovely name in its own right.  However, if some people here are complaining about a harmless slip of the tongue, they should be grateful that they don't have far worse problems to complain about.

I'm going to cop to this so that there is no misunderstanding.  During private messaging with Kristina, I made the observation that it was nice to see her post on IHD and that you, enginist, had posted a very charming "welcome back".  She noted that you had been calling her "katrina" and that she thought that was a lovely name, that it was "continental" and even "Russian sounding". 

I then explained that whenever I heard the name "Katrina", it reminded me of the hurricane, and I went on to explain how people were impacted.  My mother's family is from Mississippi, and her parents, upon retiring, bought a small home near the beach in Long Beach.  I spent many, many summers there.  I remember when Camille hit and we were all so worried about my grandparents.

They had died long before Hurricane Katrina hit, but the house was still very much a part of the family.  I told Kristina about the horrific damage as I was there 6 months after the storm, and it still looked like something in a bad apocalypse movie.  My aunt had just bought a home in Gulfport, and the winds of the storm blew a container truck filled with frozen chickens onto her property.  You can imagine what that was like.

Having lived in New Orleans for some years, I'm sure you have a story or two.

Anyway, I in no way was complaining, rather, I thought Kristina might be interested in this rather significant even in the history of a particular part of the US.  While I was not "distressed" at all, it did bring back some sad memories, but I certainly did not think you rude or insensitive.  I hope this clears things up! 

Iolaire, I sometimes still use British words and idioms without realizing it, and I can get some weird reactions.  She "fell pregnant" sounds nicer than "she got pregnant"!

Edited to add:  To make this post relevant to the topic of skin cancer, both of my parents developed skin cancer in their elder years, my dad on the back of his hand (I never saw it), and my mom on her face.  It was an oval shaped, black spot that was fairly large.  Neither of them ever wore sunscreen or took any precautions at all.  My dad liked running/walking, and my mom enjoyed gardening, so they both spent a lot of time outdoors...in Texas.  So, I suppose it was inevitable.
« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 02:07:20 PM by MooseMom » Logged

"Eggs are so inadequate, don't you think?  I mean, they ought to be able to become anything, but instead you always get a chicken.  Or a duck.  Or whatever they're programmed to be.  You never get anything interesting, like regret, or the middle of last week."
enginist
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« Reply #33 on: June 26, 2020, 04:46:42 PM »

Katrina does sound Russia, as does Katerina.  The former, unfortunately, has negative connotations, but I don't think that Kristina is anything like a hurricane. 

Yes, I have some stories, but nothing like a truck of chickens jackknifed on the lawn.  Although I did hear of some fraternity guys who rented a motel room in Biloxi during Camille.  They wanted a hurricane party on the beach, but the storm hurled a sailboat though their window, killing four.   

I wonder if skin cancer is considered an underlying condition. 
« Last Edit: June 26, 2020, 05:05:56 PM by enginist » Logged
MooseMom
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« Reply #34 on: June 26, 2020, 06:03:14 PM »

I remember the story of the frat boys in a Biloxi hotel.  It was a true story.

Yes, skin cancer would be considered a pre-existing condition if you were to change insurers, who would price that in accordingly.
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"Eggs are so inadequate, don't you think?  I mean, they ought to be able to become anything, but instead you always get a chicken.  Or a duck.  Or whatever they're programmed to be.  You never get anything interesting, like regret, or the middle of last week."
UkrainianTracksuit
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« Reply #35 on: June 26, 2020, 06:45:47 PM »

Is there a problem with "sounding Russian?"  :P Don't make me drop the gloves a second time in the same day over a similar thing!
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kristina
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« Reply #36 on: June 27, 2020, 02:37:50 PM »

Is there a problem with "sounding Russian?"  :P Don't make me drop the gloves a second time in the same day over a similar thing!

Hello Ukrainian Tracksuit,
Perhaps enginist might refer to me “sounding Russian” and that would be cleverly observed, since my late mother came from a White émigré family who had to leave Russia in 1917.
Kind regards from Kristina. :grouphug;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
Michael Murphy
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« Reply #37 on: June 27, 2020, 06:06:51 PM »

In the last 15 years I have had a cancerous mole or pre cancerous removed every year.  My symptom of these is a intense itching on my back in the area of the mole.  In fact if I contact my Dermatologist with this symptom I usually get a appointment with in the week instead of a month.  My problem is as a youth I had the same neon white skin I am cursed with today spend any time in the sun and I go from neon white to neon red and back to neon white in short order.  This was made worse by the attitude of the 50’s and 60’s that get out of the house and into the sun as it’s good for you that every one had in that era.
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enginist
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« Reply #38 on: June 28, 2020, 04:18:59 PM »

As it happens, Katrina is German in origin.  Katerina, on the other hand, is as Russian as Anastasia, who was killed with her family by the Bolsheviks in Yekaterinberg.  Kristina is Scandinavian, a variant of Christina, which ultimately is Greek in origin. 
« Last Edit: June 28, 2020, 04:23:00 PM by enginist » Logged
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