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Author Topic: When starting dialysis  (Read 412 times)
jambo101
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« on: October 28, 2018, 12:32:42 AM »

How many treatments before one feels an improvement in health?
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Michael Murphy
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« Reply #1 on: October 28, 2018, 12:43:52 AM »

In my experience it could take several weeks.  First they donít start you at the time you end up at, in my case they started me at 3 hours and gradually increased it to 4.5 hours.   Second they may also start you at a lower pump speed.  Finally if you started before you felt bad there may not be a major difference after treatment.
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rcjordan
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« Reply #2 on: October 28, 2018, 06:18:34 AM »

And how is your hemoglobin?  If it is low, it takes some meds/time to get it back in range.  Though I was in generally good health other than ESRD, I felt very weak for a couple of months.
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Coastal US, NE North Carolina
2018 right nephrectomy - cancer. Left kidney not filtering, start hemo. After 3 months, start Nxstage home hemo
Charlie B53
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« Reply #3 on: October 28, 2018, 08:27:58 AM »


How you feel depends on a lot of things besides just getting your treatment time in.

How well you control your diet, fluid intake, and how well your Labs come back all play a huge part in how well you will feel.

It takes serious attention to diet, meds, maybe even physical activity to regain health and feel better.

That is going to take some effort on your part as well as some education.

If you haven't already start reading up on Renal Diets.  Lots of good advise there so you can make better decisions on what to eat and what to avoid that you may still be eating and drinking.
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GA_DAWG
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2018, 09:51:07 AM »

Something I was told would happen, and it did, was after they were able to begin using a graft, or fistula, it became easier than when they were using the catheter. As noted by others also, it becomes easier if you are able to make the transition to the renal diet and the accompanying fluid restrictions. If you are able to accept them and adapt to them rather than fighting against them, it becomes easier. It is much easier to have 2 kilos removes than to have 4.
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kristina
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« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2018, 01:11:23 PM »

How many treatments before one feels an improvement in health?

I instantly felt much better, mainly because I was totally relieved that dialysis-treatments are not as bad as I had feared and my body felt much better shortly after starting dialysis as well and I also realized that I was able to concentrate much better again and became my own self again. I also realized pretty quickly one of the most important survival-tools of dialysis for me i.e. the more rigid I adhere to my fluid-restrictions and my diet etc., the better is my quality of life.
Good luck wishes from Kristina. :grouphug;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kitkatz
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« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2018, 01:41:52 PM »

As others have already said, it is up to you and your involvement in your care and treatment.
Go to dialysis regularly. Do not skip.
Watch your fluid intake if needed.
Watch your diet.  Read about it.
See your renal team regularly.  Ask questions. Get answers.
« Last Edit: October 28, 2018, 07:28:44 PM by kitkatz » Logged



lifenotonthelist.com

Ivanova: "Old Egyptian blessing: May God stand between you and harm in all the empty places you must walk." Babylon 5

Remember your present situation is not your final destination.

Take it one day, one hour, one minute, one second at a time.

"If we don't find a way out of this soon, I'm gonna lose it. Lose it... It means go crazy, nuts, insane, bonzo, no longer in possession of ones faculties, three fries short of a Happy Meal, wacko!" Jack O'Neill - SG-1
Mr Ken
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« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2018, 05:39:58 PM »

Believe it or not I felt better before HemoDialysis even with ESRD. Sound crazy but true for me..... Hemo takes a lot out of you. The process hammers your electrolytes. The hardest part for me is the beverage restrictions. Big person big thirst. Problem is it goes in but foes not come out and Hemo and PD could only take so much out per session. PD is more difficult with fluid extraction than is with Hemo having a machine filter it out.   

Ken
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Michael Murphy
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« Reply #8 on: October 28, 2018, 07:26:48 PM »

The reality is dialysis is a commitment to a restrictive diet,a. never ending series of medical treatments and doctor appointments.  These doctors include more than nephrologists dialysis put a strain on the heart and a yearly visit to a cardiologist is probably a good idea for most patients.  I became lost in the number of doctor visits and did not see my cardiologist for 2 years.  Result 2 years ago a major heart attack with the end result of a added benefit of vtach which caused implantation of a defibrillator and twice a year visits for checks.   ESRD is a tough task master, however the future should not look all gloomy work is being done on a Implantable Artificial Kidney which may eliminate most of the BS.
« Last Edit: October 29, 2018, 09:10:57 AM by Michael Murphy » Logged
kristina
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« Reply #9 on: October 29, 2018, 06:56:32 AM »

ESRD is a tough task master, however the future should not look all gloomy work is being done on a Implantable Artificial Kidney which may eliminate most of the BS.

Hello Michael, do you think an implantable artificial kidney might be under way i.e. during our life-time?
I do hope so very much, but I have not heard anything definite about it yet.
Best wishes from Kristina and thanks for answering. :grouphug;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
cassandra
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When all else fails run in circles, shout loudly

« Reply #10 on: October 29, 2018, 11:14:27 AM »

Hi Kristina, I found this article the most uplifting yet.
And depending on life-span, could be .......


  https://www.kidneybuzz.com/artificial-implantable-kidney-is-beginning-to-transition-and-gear-up-for-human-testing/2018/1/29/artificial-implantable-kidney-is-beginning-to-transition-and-gearing-up-for-human-testing
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I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left

1983 high proteinloss in urine, chemo, stroke,coma, dialysis
1984 double nephrectomy
1985 transplant from dad
1998 lost dads kidney, start PD
2003 peritineum burst, back to hemo
2012 start Nxstage home hemo
       still on waitinglist, still ok I think
kristina
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« Reply #11 on: October 29, 2018, 11:44:32 AM »

Hi Kristina, I found this article the most uplifting yet.
And depending on life-span, could be .......


  https://www.kidneybuzz.com/artificial-implantable-kidney-is-beginning-to-transition-and-gear-up-for-human-testing/2018/1/29/artificial-implantable-kidney-is-beginning-to-transition-and-gearing-up-for-human-testing

Many thanks Cassandra, this link certainly gives lots of hope to many and I thank you so much to give me a much needed uplift ! And it was ever so sweet of you and is very much appreciated ! ! :cheer:
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
coldhoist
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« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2018, 08:18:24 PM »

To be honest, I felt better after two or three treatment. Before I started dialysis, I felt like crap. Afterwards, I felt like I had been given my life back. But, now after two year of treatment, I feel like crap again.
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