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Author Topic: The music in our lives  (Read 8051 times)
Blake nighsonger
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« Reply #150 on: March 14, 2017, 07:29:54 PM »

Glory B
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kristina
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« Reply #151 on: March 15, 2017, 12:57:24 PM »


 ...  Most unusual performance of Ode an die Freude ( Ode to Joy ) by Ludwig van Beethoven  ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbJcQYVtZMo

Oh, my!  This made me cry.  My spine actually tingled!

The choir was a big surprise!  I didn't see that coming.

Thanks so much for posting this, Kristina.  I will make it a habit to watch it any time I feel like the world is coming to an end, which is pretty much every day these days.   ::)

Many thanks MooseMom and Blake nighsonger for your touching thoughts, it makes me very happy that you feel like that ... 
...  and ... it just goes to show that music has a very magic touch and connects people all over the world ...  :cuddle;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #152 on: March 20, 2017, 03:15:36 PM »

One of the most unforgettable pieces in piano music is by the Russian composer Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein: Réve Angélique
played here by the Finnish pianist Jouni Somero,piano - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkyDa1A0HSc

Réve Angélique was composed by Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein whilst being driven to the palace of The Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (sister of the Tsar) to perform on the piano at her soirée (an evening party or gathering) and he was not only a composer but also one of the very best pianists of his time... I also should mention here that Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein was often called "van II", not only because he looked a bit like Beethoven but there were also certain rumours ...

P.S. Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein died in Peterhof, having suffered from heart disease for some time. All his life he had felt himself something of an outsider; he wrote of himself in his notebooks “Russians call me German, Germans call me Russian, Jews call me a Christian, Christians a Jew. Pianists call me a composer, composers call me a pianist. The classicists think me a futurist, and the futurists call me a reactionary. My conclusion is that I am neither fish nor fowl – a pitiful individual”.

The street in St. Petersburg where he lived is now named after him.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 03:50:14 AM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
Riki
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« Reply #153 on: March 21, 2017, 05:12:11 AM »

P.S. Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein died in Peterhof, having suffered from heart disease for some time. All his life he had felt himself something of an outsider; he wrote of himself in his notebooks “Russians call me German, Germans call me Russian, Jews call me a Christian, Christians a Jew. Pianists call me a composer, composers call me a pianist. The classicists think me a futurist, and the futurists call me a reactionary. My conclusion is that I am neither fish nor fowl – a pitiful individual”.

Sounds like an artist.  If you are good at your craft, you tend to be alienated by your contemporaries.  Also, a good many artists suffer from some form of depression, or at the very least, self-depreciation.  You are never good enough, in your own eyes, to be accepted by the group.  In my own case, I THINK I'm not accepted, but really, I am.  It's possible he felt that way as well.
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kristina
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« Reply #154 on: March 24, 2017, 12:12:59 PM »

P.S. Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein died in Peterhof, having suffered from heart disease for some time. All his life he had felt himself something of an outsider; he wrote of himself in his notebooks “Russians call me German, Germans call me Russian, Jews call me a Christian, Christians a Jew. Pianists call me a composer, composers call me a pianist. The classicists think me a futurist, and the futurists call me a reactionary. My conclusion is that I am neither fish nor fowl – a pitiful individual”.

Sounds like an artist.  If you are good at your craft, you tend to be alienated by your contemporaries.  Also, a good many artists suffer from some form of depression, or at the very least, self-depreciation.  You are never good enough, in your own eyes, to be accepted by the group.  In my own case, I THINK I'm not accepted, but really, I am.  It's possible he felt that way as well.

That was very well observed Riki, because Anton Gregorevich Rubinstein was very much an artist! For many years he gave many pianist-recitals all over the world and when there were enough savings to retire he refused lucrative  offers to give further recitals with the argument that he had been working very hard since being a child ... His piano-playing was very much admired by all listeners for his very sensitive touch and almost everyone was staggered by his playing and Sergey Rachmaninov studied his art very closely.
 
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #155 on: March 26, 2017, 07:33:47 AM »

My two top-favourite and most unusual piano players at the moment:

The first one is a man playing on a street-piano in Sarasota: an ex-marine who became homeless:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCguq3hTC2M


And here is the update about the above ex-marine homeless man playing on a street-piano in Sarasota:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gt5H-pSsyiM

The other is a Russian Security officer who could not resist when he noticed a street-piano:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6Zg-1xiUYw
 
And here is an update on the above Russian Security officer (soldier) playing on a street-piano in a balaclava:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTy24gIrRL0


P.S. I have re-edited today because some commercials have "crept in" and I have tried my best to delete them...
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 01:30:21 PM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
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