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Author Topic: The music in our lives  (Read 13073 times)
Blake nighsonger
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« Reply #150 on: March 14, 2017, 07:29:54 PM »

Glory B
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kristina
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« Reply #151 on: March 15, 2017, 12:57:24 PM »


 ...  Most unusual performance of Ode an die Freude ( Ode to Joy ) by Ludwig van Beethoven  ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kbJcQYVtZMo

Oh, my!  This made me cry.  My spine actually tingled!

The choir was a big surprise!  I didn't see that coming.

Thanks so much for posting this, Kristina.  I will make it a habit to watch it any time I feel like the world is coming to an end, which is pretty much every day these days.   ::)

Many thanks MooseMom and Blake nighsonger for your touching thoughts, it makes me very happy that you feel like that ... 
...  and ... it just goes to show that music has a very magic touch and connects people all over the world ...  :cuddle;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #152 on: March 20, 2017, 03:15:36 PM »

One of the most unforgettable pieces in piano music is by the Russian composer Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein: Réve Angélique
played here by the Finnish pianist Jouni Somero,piano - YouTube

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HkyDa1A0HSc

Réve Angélique was composed by Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein whilst being driven to the palace of The Grand Duchess Elena Pavlovna (sister of the Tsar) to perform on the piano at her soirée (an evening party or gathering) and he was not only a composer but also one of the very best pianists of his time... I also should mention here that Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein was often called "van II", not only because he looked a bit like Beethoven but there were also certain rumours ...

P.S. Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein died in Peterhof, having suffered from heart disease for some time. All his life he had felt himself something of an outsider; he wrote of himself in his notebooks “Russians call me German, Germans call me Russian, Jews call me a Christian, Christians a Jew. Pianists call me a composer, composers call me a pianist. The classicists think me a futurist, and the futurists call me a reactionary. My conclusion is that I am neither fish nor fowl – a pitiful individual”.

The street in St. Petersburg where he lived is now named after him.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2017, 03:50:14 AM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
Riki
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« Reply #153 on: March 21, 2017, 05:12:11 AM »

P.S. Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein died in Peterhof, having suffered from heart disease for some time. All his life he had felt himself something of an outsider; he wrote of himself in his notebooks “Russians call me German, Germans call me Russian, Jews call me a Christian, Christians a Jew. Pianists call me a composer, composers call me a pianist. The classicists think me a futurist, and the futurists call me a reactionary. My conclusion is that I am neither fish nor fowl – a pitiful individual”.

Sounds like an artist.  If you are good at your craft, you tend to be alienated by your contemporaries.  Also, a good many artists suffer from some form of depression, or at the very least, self-depreciation.  You are never good enough, in your own eyes, to be accepted by the group.  In my own case, I THINK I'm not accepted, but really, I am.  It's possible he felt that way as well.
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kristina
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« Reply #154 on: March 24, 2017, 12:12:59 PM »

P.S. Anton Grigorevich Rubinstein died in Peterhof, having suffered from heart disease for some time. All his life he had felt himself something of an outsider; he wrote of himself in his notebooks “Russians call me German, Germans call me Russian, Jews call me a Christian, Christians a Jew. Pianists call me a composer, composers call me a pianist. The classicists think me a futurist, and the futurists call me a reactionary. My conclusion is that I am neither fish nor fowl – a pitiful individual”.

Sounds like an artist.  If you are good at your craft, you tend to be alienated by your contemporaries.  Also, a good many artists suffer from some form of depression, or at the very least, self-depreciation.  You are never good enough, in your own eyes, to be accepted by the group.  In my own case, I THINK I'm not accepted, but really, I am.  It's possible he felt that way as well.

That was very well observed Riki, because Anton Gregorevich Rubinstein was very much an artist! For many years he gave many pianist-recitals all over the world and when there were enough savings to retire he refused lucrative  offers to give further recitals with the argument that he had been working very hard since being a child ... His piano-playing was very much admired by all listeners for his very sensitive touch and almost everyone was staggered by his playing and Sergey Rachmaninov studied his art very closely.
 
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #155 on: March 26, 2017, 07:33:47 AM »

My two top-favourite and most unusual piano players at the moment:

The first one is a man playing on a street-piano in Sarasota: an ex-marine who became homeless:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JCguq3hTC2M


And here is the update about the above ex-marine homeless man playing on a street-piano in Sarasota:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gt5H-pSsyiM

The other is a Russian Security officer who could not resist when he noticed a street-piano:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N6Zg-1xiUYw
 
And here is an update on the above Russian Security officer (soldier) playing on a street-piano in a balaclava:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lTy24gIrRL0


P.S. I have re-edited today because some commercials have "crept in" and I have tried my best to delete them...
« Last Edit: March 27, 2017, 01:30:21 PM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
Riki
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« Reply #156 on: March 30, 2017, 11:43:49 AM »

I've been listening to the Hamilton soundtrack for the last few days, and I'm loving it.  I'm keeping my eye out for tickets to go on sale for the show in Boston next year.  I'm getting to know the songs so well that if I ever do get to see the show, I will be that annoying theater goer who sings the words to all the songs. *G*
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kristina
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« Reply #157 on: April 02, 2017, 03:41:03 PM »

Louis Moreau Gottschalk  (May 8, 1829, New Orleans - December 18, 1869, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) is my favourite American composer and he was best known as a virtuoso performer of his own romantic piano works.

Louis Moreau Gottschalk - La Savane, Op. 3 - played by the pianist Jimin Oh-Havenith

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gxoGVOwauTc
« Last Edit: April 02, 2017, 03:44:21 PM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
MooseMom
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« Reply #158 on: April 02, 2017, 06:38:21 PM »

That was aurally delicious, Kristina!  Thanks for posting that!
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« Reply #159 on: April 03, 2017, 07:30:01 AM »

Thank you MooseMom, I am very happy that you also enjoy his unusual way of composing. I first came across his compositions when we visited the historic piano Museum at Finchcocks (unfortunately no longer in existence) , where they played his compositions on historic pianos of his times by Graf, John Broadwood & Son and the concert was very impressive.
Louis Moreau Gottschalk wrote most interesting thoughts about being a pianist i.e. "The sound is the execution of the pianist what colours are in painting. We often see fine pictures admirably drawn which nevertheless appear cold to us. They are wanting in colour. Many pianists, whose thundering execution astonishes us, nevertheless do not move us; they are ignorant of sound. Drawing and execution are acquired by labour. Colour and sound are born in us and are the outward expressions of our sensibility and of our soul."
Louis Moreau Gottschalk started on his last Concert tour to South America and, after many adventures, died at the age of 40 in December 1869 in Rio de Janeiro, where he was mourned as a national hero.
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
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« Reply #160 on: April 03, 2017, 12:40:24 PM »

For as long as I can remember, I've loved watching ice skating competitions.  The 2017 World Championships in Helsinki have just finished, and this one particular pairs free skate captivated me.  The music is "Lighthouse" by Patrick Watson about whom I know absolutely nothing, but I really liked it.  So for your viewing and listening pleasure whenever you may be feeling fraught, this is for you.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=timzDGZttZo
« Last Edit: April 03, 2017, 12:42:30 PM by MooseMom » Logged

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« Reply #161 on: April 05, 2017, 03:47:18 AM »

Many thanks MooseMom for posting this !!! It practically restores my faith in ice scating-competitions !!! It is so refreshing to watch Aliona Savchenko and Bruno Massot and see their beautifully worked-out most sensitive ice-dancing performance, where most difficult technical features are practically "thrown in" as a by-the-way-addition to their artistically perfect and most beautiful performance ! When I grew up I always looked forward to watch ice scating competitions and I loved every minute of it !!! But then, I believe it was in the late 1970's, early 1980's, when I felt that ice scating competitions became a bit too technical in order to please the judges and it also appeared a bit political when judges gave their vote mainly to ice scaters of their own native country... All that appears to have changed for the better now and I am so pleased to see it happening! It is so wonderfully refreshing to see a French ice scater (Bruno Massot) dancing in complete harmony with a Russian ice scater (Aliona Savchenko) and they compete together for Germany and it is just wonderful to watch their most artistic, very sensitive and technically perfect performance !
Thanks again MooseMom for sharing with us this wonderful development in competitive ice scating !
Best wishes from Kristina. :grouphug;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
PrimeTimer
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« Reply #162 on: April 05, 2017, 11:19:53 AM »

Many thanks MooseMom for posting this !!! It practically restores my faith in ice scating-competitions !!! It is so refreshing to watch Aliona Savchenko and Bruno Massot and see their beautifully worked-out most sensitive ice-dancing performance, where most difficult technical features are practically "thrown in" as a by-the-way-addition to their artistically perfect and most beautiful performance ! When I grew up I always looked forward to watch ice scating competitions and I loved every minute of it !!! But then, I believe it was in the late 1970's, early 1980's, when I felt that ice scating competitions became a bit too technical in order to please the judges and it also appeared a bit political when judges gave their vote mainly to ice scaters of their own native country... All that appears to have changed for the better now and I am so pleased to see it happening! It is so wonderfully refreshing to see a French ice scater (Bruno Massot) dancing in complete harmony with a Russian ice scater (Aliona Savchenko) and they compete together for Germany and it is just wonderful to watch their most artistic, very sensitive and technically perfect performance !
Thanks again MooseMom for sharing with us this wonderful development in competitive ice scating !
Best wishes from Kristina. :grouphug;

kristina: I hope to sit down and listen to some of the music you love and suggest and watch some videos of the skating too. I love pair skating! Sounds like all this could be relaxing and I very much need that.  :)
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« Reply #163 on: April 05, 2017, 12:25:40 PM »

PrimeTimer, try going to you tube and search for "Helsinki ice skating 2017" or "Helsinki world championships 2017", and you'll be able to find many of the medal winning performances from this past weekend.  If you include "FS" in your search, you'll find videos of the free skating portion of all of the separate competitions (pairs, dance, men's and women's individual)  If you include "SP", you'll find the short programs.  It's well worth watching when you're feeling a bit down.

Kristina, I remember the bad ol' days when it certainly seemed like the scoring was political.  They've overhauled the scoring protocol, and you don't hear those sorts of complaints, anymore.  Thank goodness for that!
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kristina
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« Reply #164 on: April 05, 2017, 01:36:29 PM »

Hello PrimeTimer I do hope you get the time to relax very soon and have some "me-time"... :waving;
and hello MooseMom ... and ... yes, it is so good to know that the ol' politically induced scoring protocol is finally "a thing of the past"... :waving;
P.S. Spring has finally arrived here in London and all of a sudden everything looks ever so bright ... :2thumbsup;
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
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« Reply #165 on: April 07, 2017, 02:45:41 PM »

Today I listened again to one of my favourite pianists Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff who was also one of the very best interpreters of Chopin:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGO4SGC2eow

Wilhelm Walter Friedrich Kempff (25 November 1895 – 23 May 1991) was a German pianist and composer. Although his repertoire included Bach, Mozart, Chopin, Schumann, Liszt and Brahms, Kempff was particularly well known for his interpretations of the music of Ludwig van Beethoven and Franz Schubert. He recorded the complete collection of their piano sonatas and is considered to have been one of the chief exponents of the Germanic tradition during the 20th century and one of the greatest pianists of all time.

P.S It is sad that there were those strange unfitting pictures put in and unfortunately this is the only edition of Kempff's interpretation of Chopin's pianoconcerto I could find on the Internet ...
« Last Edit: April 07, 2017, 03:00:40 PM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #166 on: April 14, 2017, 02:54:04 AM »

My current favourite composition by Georg Friedrich Händel, originally composed for the flute and later transcribed by Wilhelm Kempff for the piano.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6lhHJ2ZAfvE
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
MooseMom
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« Reply #167 on: April 15, 2017, 04:25:57 PM »

We've been watching ITV's "Home Fires" (Season 2) on PBS, and the theme song has always stayed in my head for hours after watching the latest episode.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vIuEo0cgLos
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kristina
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« Reply #168 on: May 07, 2017, 03:21:33 AM »


Jean Rondeau plays Bach's Chaconne on harpsichord. He is a French musician best known for his performances on harpsichord. Early taught by Blandine Verlet, he was later educated at Paris' Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique. Jean Rondeau won Young Soloist 2014 in the Prix des Radios Francophones Publiques and has gone on to release two solo albums.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ChKsMjIMFw
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #169 on: May 07, 2017, 01:50:32 PM »

 François Couperin: Les Barricades Mystérieuses, Hanneke van Proosdij, harpsichord

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=syB9mxe8CHk

Hanneke van Proosdij studied harpsichord and organ with Jacques Ogg at the Royal Conservatory in The Hague, the Netherlands, where she also studied recorder and composition.
She received her DM (teaching diploma) in 1992 and UM (solo diploma) in 1995. She performs with Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra, the American Bach Soloists, Magnificat, Parnassus Ave, Chanticleer, Orinda and Farallon Recorder Quartet.
Festival appearances include the Berkeley Early Music Festival, Internationale Handel Festpiele Goettingen, Amherst Early Music Festival, Festival d'Ambronnay, Wratislavia Cantans, Contemporary Improvised Music Festival and the American Bach Soloists SummerFest.
Hanneke is the Director of the San Francisco Early Music Society Medieval Renaissance Summer Festival.


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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
kristina
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« Reply #170 on: May 07, 2017, 02:07:48 PM »

This is one of the most beautiful compositions by J.S Bach (1685-1750)  from his Brandenburg Concertos,
Concerto No. 6 in B-flat Major (written in 1721), BWV 1051: Adagio, ma non tanto

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gupCd0WT9oY

J.S. Bach's Brandenburg Concertos: a musical job application
Normally, job applications tend to involve a lot of CV-massaging and begging letters. Not for J.S. Bach, though - he wrote his Brandenburg Concertos to try and get work with Christian Ludwig, Margrave of Brandenburg. Perhaps not realising that he was dealing with one of the great musical geniuses of the time, the Margrave didn't even bother to get back in touch with Bach.

And here is Nikolaus Harnoncourt's interpretation (Johann Nikolaus Graf [Count] de la Fontaine und d’Harnoncourt-Unverzagt; 6 December 1929 – 5 March 2016) was an Austrian conductor, particularly known for his historically informed performances of music from the Classical era and earlier. Starting out as a classical cellist, he founded his own period instrument ensemble, Concentus Musicus Wien.
Nikolaus Harnoncourt was born Johann Nikolaus Graf de la Fontaine und d’Harnoncourt-Unverzagt in Berlin, Germany. His mother, Ladislaja Gräfin von Meran, Freiin von Brandhoven, was the great-granddaughter of the Habsburg Archduke Johann, the 13th child of the Emperor Leopold II, making him a descendant of various Holy Roman Emperors and other European royalty and his father was Eberhard de la Fontaine Graf d'Harnoncourt-Unverzagt.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e9N0qt_HXdA
« Last Edit: May 07, 2017, 02:38:22 PM by kristina » Logged

Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
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« Reply #171 on: May 07, 2017, 03:35:00 PM »

Hanneke is the Director of the San Francisco Early Music Society Medieval Renaissance Summer Festival.

Can there be a better job?   :2thumbsup;
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« Reply #172 on: May 07, 2017, 03:36:45 PM »

This is one of the most beautiful compositions by J.S Bach (1685-1750)  from his Brandenburg Concertos,
Concerto No. 6 in B-flat Major (written in 1721), BWV 1051: Adagio, ma non tanto


I often listen to the Brandenburg Concertos while I'm doing housework upstairs.  I kid you not.  Bach and Sia.
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« Reply #173 on: May 07, 2017, 09:47:14 PM »

Sometimes need a little Enya to relax and escape.  :kickstart; Makes me want to get on a bike and disappear for a while down the road. And keep on going.


https://youtu.be/5S-5GpKUdj8


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« Reply #174 on: May 17, 2017, 01:24:54 PM »

Who knows what the masters might do...they got their big deals goin on, goin on...got nothing to do with me and you... >:D

Golden Gates by John Cougar Mellencamp

https://youtu.be/6a0gU_klr2M


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