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Author Topic: travelling after transplant? im on dialysis  (Read 6996 times)
lou
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« on: October 30, 2009, 11:17:02 AM »

OK well I'm a bit scared to ask this because I'm worried what the responses will be but here goes.....

basically i have just stated pd this week and I'm on the transplant list and hoping...

I am 29 and live with my boyfriend. Before all this kidney crap started we loved travelling. We spent a year backpacking around Thailand, Australia and New Zealand and loved it. All we really want to do in life is travel and maybe live abroad sometime. (neither of us want children).

I am so scared that after I get a transplant (I'm trying to be positive that it will happen!) travelling will be so hard. Everytime I go to the doctors they try and reassure me I will be able to have kids but they never mention traveling. I once asked the the doctor laughed and said "Well I wouldn't go to India if I were you". I think he was trying to make a joke but I just wanted to cry because i DO want to go to India. I want to go everywhere and I know it will never be as simple now but is it possible?

My boyfriend is being so positive saying "we're not going to let this stop us doing anything" but I'm so worried we wont be able to do things. I would feel so terrible if my kidney ruined his dreams as well as mine.

Is there anyone out there who has had a transplant and travelled? To Thailand, Mexico or anywhere?

I will be holding my breath hoping to get a positive message back.

I know this may seem like a strange question to some people but its really all i keep thinking about.


Would be lovely to hear back from anyone,

Louise xxx








EDITED:Moved to travel section-kitkatz,Moderator

« Last Edit: November 27, 2009, 06:23:37 PM by kitkatz » Logged
okarol
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« Reply #1 on: October 30, 2009, 11:55:49 AM »


After a transplant your immune system is reduced by anti-rejection meds, so there's a possibility of having a tougher time if you got a bacterial infection. That's why they tell you not to eat raw sushi, or undercooked meat, or cookie dough with raw eggs, or open buffets where the food may have been out too long. I know many people who are very healthy since their transplant, they travel the world and enjoy life! 
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kellyt
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« Reply #2 on: October 30, 2009, 12:22:43 PM »

My 75-year-old friend who transplanted one month after me leaves with his wife on a cruise around the world (120 days) in January.  I was told not to travel the first 6 months or so, but we don't have anywhere to go.  :(

You'll be fine.  :)  Watch what you eat, stay away from strange animals and kids.  :)
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1993 diagnosed with glomerulonephritis.
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« Reply #3 on: October 30, 2009, 02:17:14 PM »

A cruise around the world sounds fine, because cruise lines are careful about keeping things clean and sanitary to avoid the (easier on a cruise) transmission of contagions, and the food is controlled and the water is clean. If you travel to another country like Thailand or Mexico, eating at places that don't specifically cater to tourists, and drinking water that's not bottled is risky because of native organisms you're not accustomed to. It often gives normal people "traveler's diarrhea" or more unpleasant food poisoning. I can only imagine it would be more dangerous for someone on immunosuppressant drugs, especially someone in the first 6 months to a year after transplant, when the immune suppression is greater.
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3/2007Kidney failure diagnosed5/2010In-center hemodialysis
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RichardMEL
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« Reply #4 on: November 01, 2009, 05:00:44 AM »

Travel post transplant should be no problem. Heck I have a number of trips planned just waiting for that damn call!  :rofl;

Seriously though the only real issues to be thinking about are medical access in a remote area and sanitary conditions of food. I mean if you're in a western country no problem, even parts of asia should be fine... but some other places you'd have to be careful of food and so on.. but then again I think most people need to be careful of such things.

Obviously you need to keep your medications up to date while away, and a long term trip may cause some issues in terms of keeping a supply of the appropriate medications - and in some parts of the world supply may be difficult (or even illegal??!)

All those things can be worked out post transplant.

You certainly should be able to get travelling again!! I know it because it's right up the top of the list of my "must haves" too!!

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3/1993: Diagnosed with Kidney Failure (FSGS)
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27/11/2010: Cadaveric kidney transplant from my wonderful donor!!! "Danny" currently settling in and working better every day!!! :)

BE POSITIVE * BE INFORMED * BE PROACTIVE * BE IN CONTROL * LIVE LIFE!
Slywalker
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« Reply #5 on: November 01, 2009, 08:23:26 AM »

I am two years post transplant.  I went on a cruise five months after my transplant - the cruise was booked a year in advance when the transplant date had not been on the horizon.  My doc was a little nervous but told me to keep hydrated and of course hand washing was a must.  Everything was fine.  Since then I have traveled a couple of times and quite a few times to visit my daughter plus I work full time.  You have to have a heightened sense of hygiene because your immune system is compromised.  If you take good care of yourself and take your meds everything should be fine.

Good luck.

 :bunny:
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Melissa
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« Reply #6 on: November 01, 2009, 08:45:24 AM »

I traveled all over while I had my transplant, including India, Thailand, Hong Kong, China, Taiwan, Mexico....the longest trip was for one month.  I was not in very remote places, but even so I did spend some extra money on having special travel medical insurance in case something happened and I had to be rushed home. 
I think once you're stable enough after the transplant travel should be at the top of your list!  I had to stay local for a few years but then I was good to go!  Being back on dialysis now makes me appreciate even more that I was able to go to all these places while I was able.
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lou
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« Reply #7 on: November 01, 2009, 10:09:44 AM »


Thank you, thank you, thank you, for these replies!

Feeling much happier since reading them and feel even more determined not to let this blooming kidney stuff stop me seeing the world  :2thumbsup;

Hope you are all doing ok, chat soon,
Louise xx
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kitkatz
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« Reply #8 on: November 01, 2009, 04:52:45 PM »

I am currently trying to do some traveling around the United States while I am on dialysis. Since I am stuck on dialysis for whatever remains of my life I plan to travel and see the sites.
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Ivanova: "Old Egyptian blessing: May God stand between you and harm in all the empty places you must walk." Babylon 5

Remember your present situation is not your final destination.

Take it one day, one hour, one minute, one second at a time.

"If we don't find a way out of this soon, I'm gonna lose it. Lose it... It means go crazy, nuts, insane, bonzo, no longer in possession of ones faculties, three fries short of a Happy Meal, wacko!" Jack O'Neill - SG-1
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« Reply #9 on: November 02, 2009, 12:23:43 AM »

Hello Louise

My name is also Louise. I have not travelled since my transplant, but the only thing I would add is to always carry much, much more of your medications than you think you will need, just in case you get stranded for 24, 40 hours or even days or weeks! It has happened. Political unrest, mechanical failures - as a seasoned traveller I am sure you could think of more possibilities than me!

Somebody else mentioned to keep hydrated, and I can't stress that enough either. Just not with the local tap water! And just avoid the unsafe foods mentioned, plus any your doctors have advised you to avoid.

Hope you get your transplant soon, AND get to travel before your feet get too itchy!!
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greco02
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« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2009, 01:02:21 PM »

My husbands primary care doc had a transplant 5 years ago.  When Jim asked how did he feel, energy level etc.  The doctor told us, well, next week I am climbing the Sierra's with my son's. That is how good I feel.  This doctor must be in his 70's.   So it sounds like you will do ok. 

I have the same questions so these answers were good to review.
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Falkenbach
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« Reply #11 on: November 20, 2009, 02:03:30 AM »

Yes, I do remember talking with a man on another kidney forum, who had his transplant a short while before I did, at the same hospital (although he was from overseas). Within weeks, he had travelled to New Zealand or something, and was climbing mountains!

My post-operative course wasn't so smooth (though it's fine now), but for plenty of people they are on their feet in no time.
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jennyc
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« Reply #12 on: November 23, 2009, 12:43:35 PM »

Hi Lou,

Don't let the fear this stupid disease/failure can cause get its grips into you. I was worried about the same thing and my Dr is of the opinion 'why should it stop you doing anything, so long as your careful'. My Hubby is a Nepali and we eventually want to travel there becuase i've never been and we want our son to see it. We will also prob head to UK soon as his parents are there. My Dr has said it's fine on PD and fine on transplant so long as i only eat home prepared food, all food must be cooked and don't eat anything raw (eg raw veg, salads etc) when in countries with water that isn't upto normal western standards.

Also be aware that you'll need to chat to neph about extra medical precautions such as if you do get delhi belly (be prepared). Also don't just drink bottled water, use it to brush your teeth as well. I know my hubbies family have to boil their water a few times before even they drink with it or cook with it but even boiling doesn't kill crypto/giardia (can't quite spell it right).

Also if you travel to a country with recipricol health care it give you a bit more re-assurance that you are covered in event of emergency (Aussies have about 12 countries, Brits have more - including NZ/AUS...) Also give travelling a go while your on PD, even if you only go local or to the EU. I know the Aus govt pays for our supplies to be shipped O/S so i'd think NHS would pay as well. It's real easy to travel on PD esp if you go by car and have a cycler.
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Hadija, Athol, Me and Molly at Havelock North 09

« Reply #13 on: November 23, 2009, 01:54:07 PM »

I've been to Australia twice, LA and Las Vegas, and Samoa all while on PD.  Baxters used to ship o/s for free but they don't anymore, but we found all the airlines extremely helpful in allowing us extra weight when need for carrying bags. 
You can do it!!
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Diagnosed Nov 2007 with Multiple Myeloma.
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