I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
August 10, 2020, 04:30:58 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
530338 Posts in 33403 Topics by 12422 Members
Latest Member: ColinKint
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Dialysis Discussion
| |-+  Dialysis: Diet and Recipes (Moderator: amanda100wilson)
| | |-+  What about Tofu?
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: What about Tofu?  (Read 17464 times)
Bajanne
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5337


Goofynina and Epoman - Gone But Not Forgotten

WWW
« on: April 06, 2008, 07:46:49 PM »

My daughter and I are considering being vegetarian again.  We were years ago.  I never used tofu, but I am thinking of using it now.  what is the phosphorus content of tofu?  Is it part of a renal diet??  HELP!!
Logged

"To be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own ...but that which is based on faith"



I LOVE  my IHD family! :grouphug;
flip
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1742


« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2008, 07:57:47 PM »

It's a good source of protein but also high in phosphorus and potassium.
Logged

That which does not kill me only makes me stronger - Neitzsche
KT0930
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1831


« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2008, 08:06:25 PM »

Soy beans (isn't that what Tofu is made of?) are listed on the high potassium foods sheet that I was given when I started dialysis. I can't find it in any of the other information, though. One thing to keep in mind regarding it possibly being high in phosphorous is that all animal products are high in phosphorous, so if you cut those out, you should be okay to use tofu as a supplement. I'd check with your dietician about the potassium, however.
Logged

"Dialysis ain't for sissies" ~My wonderful husband
~~~~~~~
I received a 6 out of 6 antigen match transplant on January 9, 2008. Third transplant, first time on The List.
twirl
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 8960


« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2008, 10:10:01 PM »

I think Tofu is fine as long as it is on someone else's plate. :puke;
Logged
okarol
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 100878


Photo is Jenna - after Disneyland - 1988

WWW
« Reply #4 on: April 07, 2008, 11:15:36 PM »

This is from: http://www.aakp.org/aakp-library/Vegetarian-Kidney-Disease/

Eating Vegetarian Foods While Living With Kidney Disease

By Joan Brookshyer, RD, CSR

Historically, vegetarianism has been met with skepticism in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. However, we now know that with careful planning vegetarianism, or even part-time vegetarian eating is not only safe, but also beneficial to CKD management.1,2 Research shows eating vegetarian proteins can actually slow down the progression of kidney disease and other complications associated with this disease.1,2

Nutrition management focuses on decreasing waste product build up from digested foods, which would normally leave the body as urine. The primary goals of planning a diet with plant-based foods are three fold: 1.) obtaining the appropriate amount of plant protein to meet protein needs while minimizing waste product build up in the blood 2.) maintaining sodium, potassium and phosphorus balance and 3.) maintaining good nutrition. The following information is meant to be an initial guide to those with early kidney disease (30-50 percent of normal kidney function) and not receiving dialysis treatments. More careful follow up is recommended, especially when kidney function decreases below 30 percent or when regular dialysis treatment is required.

Quality Protein

People with CKD should modify the amount of protein they eat.1 Since plant proteins are less demanding on kidney clearance, this restriction does not need to be as severe as with animal protein diets.8 Keeping to .8 gram (g) of protein per kilogram (kg) body weight is recommended, with approximately two-thirds of this protein coming from quality plant protein or animal/plant combination, such as the following:4
Quality Protein               Serving Size = 7 g protein
Egg                                      1
Meat analogues
(processed soy foods)                2 oz.
Seitan
(Wheat gluten)                          1 oz.
Beans, dried cooked              1/2 cup
Tofu                                   1/4 - 1/2 cup
Tempeh                                    1/4 cup
Nut Butters                        2 tablespoons
Meat, Fish, Poultry                   1 oz.

EXAMPLE:

    * Your weight: 70 kg
    * Your total protein needs: 70 x .8 = 56 grams
    * Amount needed from quality protein  sources: 56 x 2/3 = 37 grams
      (1 pound = 0.4535924 kilogram)

A mixture of these protein sources should be eaten to ensure receiving an adequate balance of all essential amino acids (meat, fish and poultry are optional sources).5-8  Soy protein has been shown to be particularly beneficial in minimizing some complications associated with kidney disease. This includes proteinuria (protein loss in the urine) and minimizing hyper filtration (excess filtering of the kidney causing more kidney damage).9-12 Try to include at least one serving of soy protein per day, such as tofu, tempeh or a milk substitute, soymilk.

Sodium, Potassium, & Phosphorus

Sodium
Though vegetarian foods are healthy in general, some can be very high in sodium. A few foods to avoid for limiting sodium in plant-based foods include:

    *Convenience foods such as frozen meals, canned soup, dried soups, miso or packaged vegetable broths
    *Soy-based cheese
    *Processed dairy cheese
    *Meat analogues — this includes such foods as tofu hot dogs, veggie burgers or other  canned or frozen soy products
    *Salt, soy sauce, tamari sauce or any spices that contain the words sodium or salt

Potassium

In general, potassium does not need to be restricted unless the function of the kidney decreases to less than 20 percent. Routine blood testing is the best way to know your potassium requirements. An estimated two-thirds of diet potassium comes from fruits, vegetables and juices. So initially, the easiest way to limit this mineral will be to minimize fruit and vegetable selections to five servings per day. 

A potassium serving size:
1/2 cup fresh fruit, canned fruit or juice
1 cup fresh vegetables
1/2 cup cooked vegetables

If this does not decrease your serum potassium to the normal range, limit these foods:
High Potassium
Limit 1 per day
Textured vegetable protein   1/4 cup
Soy flour   1/4 cup
Nuts and Seeds   1/4 cup
Dried, cooked beans or lentils   1 cup
Dried cooked soybeans   1/2 cup
Tomato products   1/4 cup
Potatoes   1/2 cup
Dried fruit   1/4 cup
Tropical fruit   1/2 cup
Melons   1/2 cup

If you use a lot of beans or textured vegetable protein, alternative protein selections may be needed in order to keep potassium levels from going too high. This will mean using more tofu, tempeh, seitan and eggs or if you prefer some meat, fish or poultry to meet protein needs.

Phosphorus
Some plant proteins are high in phosphorous, but because of the high phytate content (a naturally occurring compound which blocks phosphorous absorption) these foods alone usually do not increase serum phosphorous levels.8 This includes dried cooked beans and nuts. Dairy products are the main source of concentrated phosphorus.14 This will mean decreasing dairy products to one serving or less per day. For the vegan a few other high phosphorus foods are worth noting: 
High Phosphorus
Limit 1 per day
Milk   1 cup*
Cottage Cheese   2/3 cup
Cheese   2 ounces
Pudding or custard   8 ounces
Yogurt   8 ounces
Soy cheese   4 ounces
Soy yogurt
(non fortified)   12 ounces

*Non-dairy creamer, rice milk and up to two cups of soymilk per day can be used as a replacement for milk.

Good Nutrition
A plant-based diet is often lower in calories and higher in fiber than an animal-based diet. As a result, you need to be careful you do not lose weight. Here are some ideas to help add healthy calories to your eating plan:

    *

      Soy shakes: Make shakes with soymilk, tofu, rice milk and non-dairy frozen dessert.
    *

      Adding fats: Use more oils such as olive oil, peanut oil or canola oil in cooking. Drizzle flaxseed oil on food after it is cooked, or mixed with salad dressing over lettuce.
    *

      Snacks: Eat small frequent meals if you fill up quickly.
    *

      Sweets: Even though a high sugar diet is not the best choice for food, on occasion these calories can be beneficial to avoid weight loss. Good choices are jellybeans, hard candy, sherbets or sorbet.

Vitamins and Minerals
Supplementation of vitamins and minerals in kidney disease needs to be treated on an individual basis.  Most people will require a water-soluble vitamin without fat-soluble vitamins or minerals. Mineral levels will need to be checked individually to determine if a supplement is needed. High dosages of any vitamin and or mineral in kidney disease are discouraged since the poor clearance from you kidney can cause toxic levels in the blood.15

Where To Turn For Further Help

It is best to be guided by a nephrologist and a registered dietitian that is familiar with vegetarianism for the optimum nutrition planning. Together these professionals can help manage kidney disease while assisting in appropriate vegetarian food selections.  The following organizations can help in locating a dietitian who works with vegetarians:

    *

      American Dietetic Association-Vegetarian Practice Group www.eatright.org
    *

      • Seventh Day Adventist Dietetic Associationwww.sdada.org   

Joan Brookhyser is a registered dietitian, board certified in renal nutrition, for St. Joseph Medical Center Nephrology Services in Tacoma , Washington . A renal dietitian for over 20 years, Ms. Brookhyser frequently speaks and writes on vegetarianism and kidney disease. She is a vegetarian herself and recently wrote the book, “The Vegetarian Diet for Kidney Disease Treatment.”

References:

   1. Barsotti, Giuliano, Morelli, Ester, Cupisiti, Adamasco, et al, A Low-Nitorgen Low-Phosphorus Vegan Diet for Patients with Chronic Renal Failure. Nephron 1996;74: 390-394
   2. Walser, M, Hill, S, Tomalis, E., Treatment of Nephrotic Adults with a Supplemented Very Low Protein Diet. Amer J Kid Ds Vol 28, No 3(Sept), 1996; 354-364
   3. Pagenkemper, Joni, The Impact of Vegetarianisn Diets on Renal Disease. Top Clin Nutr 1995;10(2): 22-26
   4. ADA, Vegetarian Practice Group, Fact Sheet: Vegetarian Diet in Renal Disease, 1998
   5. Pagenkemper, Joni, Planning a Vegetarian Renal Diet. J Renal Nutr, Vol 5, No 4(Oct), 1995; 234-238
   6. Pellett, Peter, Protein Requirements in Humans, Amer J Clin Nutr, 51:723-37, vol 339: 1990;1131-1134
   7. Young, Vernon and Pellett, Peter, Plant Proteins in relation to Human Protein and Amino Acid Nutrition. Amer J Clin Nutr, 1994; 59(supp):1203S-12S
   8. Patel, Chhaya, Vegetarian Renal Diet and Practical Applications, Renal Nutrition Forum ADA. Vol 19, No.3, Summer 2000
   9. Anderson, James, Soy Protein Decreases Risk for Heart Disease and Kidney Disease.   Health Benefit of Soy Products through the Life Span. Lecture October 6, 2000
  10. ADA, Vegetarian Diets, Position Paper of American Dietetic Association 1997;1317-1321
  11. Anderson, James,Blake, Jill, Turner, Jan, Smith, Belinda, Effects of soy protein on Renal function and proteinuria in patients with Type 2 Diabetes. Amer J Clin Nutr 1998;68(suppl):1347-53S
  12. Soroka, N., Silverberg, D.S., Greemland, M. et al, Comparison of a Vegetable-Based (soya) Based and an Animal-Based Low-Protein Diet in Predialysis Chronic Renal Failure Patients. Nephron 1998; 79:173-180
  13. D-Amico, G, Gentile, M, Manna, G, Et al, Effect of Vegetarian Soy Diet on Hyperlipidemia in Nephrotic Syndrome. LanceT Ltd, Vol 339, May 9, 1992; 1131-1134
  14. Brookhyser, J, Pahre, S, Dietary and Pharmacotherapeutic Consideration in the Management of Renal Osteodystrophy. Adv in Renal Replacement Therapy, Vol 2, No 1 (January) 1995;5-13
  15. Wiggins, Kerri, Guidelines for Nutrition Care of Renal Patients, 3rd Ed. 2002

The information contained herein is intended for educational purposes only. It is not intended and should not be construed as the delivery of medical care. Persons requiring diagnosis or treatment, or those with specific questions, are urged to contact their local healthcare provider for appropriate care.

This article originally appeared in the March/April 2004 issue of Kidney Beginnings: The Magazine, Vol. 3, No. 1.

Logged


Admin for IHateDialysis 2008 - 2014, retired.
Jenna is our daughter, bad bladder damaged her kidneys.
Was on in-center hemodialysis 2003-2007.
7 yr transplant lost due to rejection.
She did PD Sept. 2013 - July 2017
Found a swap living donor using social media, friends, family.
New kidney in a paired donation swap July 26, 2017.
Her story ---> https://www.facebook.com/WantedKidneyDonor
Please watch her video: http://youtu.be/D9ZuVJ_s80Y
Living Donors Rock! http://www.livingdonorsonline.org -
News video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-7KvgQDWpU
LadyStardust89
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 20


Best darnest bowie fan dialysis patient ever...

WWW
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2008, 12:19:10 PM »

I like tofu in miso soup.. But I don't eat miso anymore since it has a years portion of salt in one little bowl.. technically tofu is supposed to pick up the flavor of whatever you cook it with.. But I don't like the texture.. So i don't eat it. I tried to be a vegetarian .. but I didn't get enough protein (i realllyyy dislike beans).. I'm too much of a big meat eater.. I love my veggies and fruits... But I try to eat atleast one source of protein a day.
Logged

Bowie fan,llama fanatic... dialysis patient. Wicked.
okarol
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 100878


Photo is Jenna - after Disneyland - 1988

WWW
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2008, 12:22:30 PM »

Hey LadyStardust89 - I hope you will go to "Introduce Yourself" and tell us a little about you. I love Bowie too!


okarol/admin
Logged


Admin for IHateDialysis 2008 - 2014, retired.
Jenna is our daughter, bad bladder damaged her kidneys.
Was on in-center hemodialysis 2003-2007.
7 yr transplant lost due to rejection.
She did PD Sept. 2013 - July 2017
Found a swap living donor using social media, friends, family.
New kidney in a paired donation swap July 26, 2017.
Her story ---> https://www.facebook.com/WantedKidneyDonor
Please watch her video: http://youtu.be/D9ZuVJ_s80Y
Living Donors Rock! http://www.livingdonorsonline.org -
News video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J-7KvgQDWpU
twirl
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 8960


« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2008, 12:35:28 PM »

hello, and glad to meet you , OMG, you are so young
Jim bowie fan???? I thought you would be closer to my age.....
did you ever see the science fiction movie with Bowie and when he makes love to his wife they get soaking wet all over because water in scarce,
it is an old movie but good, it is not porn
get back with you---- I am going to google and find out the name of the movie
Logged
twirl
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 8960


« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2008, 12:44:20 PM »

The Man Who Fell from the Sky   that's the movie
Logged
BigSky
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2380


« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2008, 02:37:49 PM »

Can vary from brand to brand

Tofu, raw firm  1 ounce                       
41 mg K
34mg PO4


Tofu, raw, firm with calcium sulfate 1 ounce
67mg K
53mg PO4


Tofu, raw regular 1 ounce
34 mg K
26mg PO4

Tofu, raw regular with calcium sulfate  1 ounce
34 mg K
27mg PO4

Tofu, soft 1 ounce
50mg K
17mg PO4

Roughly only 3-5 grams protein per ounce for all tofu.

Logged
Bajanne
Member for Life
******
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 5337


Goofynina and Epoman - Gone But Not Forgotten

WWW
« Reply #10 on: April 08, 2008, 04:39:15 PM »

Thanks for the information, you guys!  As we say 'Knowledge is  Power'.  I really appreciate your input.
Logged

"To be found in Him, not having a righteousness of my own ...but that which is based on faith"



I LOVE  my IHD family! :grouphug;
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2019, Simple Machines | Terms and Policies Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!