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Author Topic: MSW  (Read 8211 times)
KT0930
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MSW
« on: August 30, 2007, 05:52:34 AM »

This is a question for current dialysis and/or transplant social workers and patients alike:

My husband and I have been discussing the idea of me returning to school to get a master's degree, and one of the two that I'm considering is an MSW so I can work either in dialysis or transplant. Current MSW's, what are the pros and cons of your job? What advice would you give to someone considering that line of work? Is there anything about the job that really surprised you, that you wish someone had told you before?

Patients (and I am one, but I really like my social workers!), I've read a lot of complaints about social workers on this site, mostly about them (and all staff) treating patients like children. What are your other complaints about them? Can you describe your ideal social worker to me?

I'm still early in the decision-making process, but want to get lots of information before I commit. Thanks everyone!
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"Dialysis ain't for sissies" ~My wonderful husband
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I received a 6 out of 6 antigen match transplant on January 9, 2008. Third transplant, first time on The List.
Sluff
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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2007, 08:12:43 AM »

The ideal Social Worker would give me some spending money at every visit. Maybe rub my back legs and feet.   :oops; did I type that out loud?
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goofynina
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He is the love of my life......

« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2007, 10:38:31 AM »

The ideal Social Worker would give me some spending money at every visit. Maybe rub my back legs and feet.   :oops; did I type that out loud?

Umm, Sluff? Doesn't MSW stand for "Male Social Worker"   :rofl;  I'd pay to see that massage allrighty  :popcorn;
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....and i think to myself, what a wonderful world....

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Sluff
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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2007, 10:40:30 AM »

The ideal Social Worker would give me some spending money at every visit. Maybe rub my back legs and feet.   :oops; did I type that out loud?

Umm, Sluff? Doesn't MSW stand for "Male Social Worker"   :rofl;  I'd pay to see that massage allrighty  :popcorn;



eeeewwwww! NOT  female poster though.  whew u scared me. But now if it were Sam I might reconsider. >:D ;)
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goofynina
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He is the love of my life......

« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2007, 10:46:28 AM »

The ideal Social Worker would give me some spending money at every visit. Maybe rub my back legs and feet.   :oops; did I type that out loud?

Umm, Sluff? Doesn't MSW stand for "Male Social Worker"   :rofl;  I'd pay to see that massage allrighty  :popcorn;



eeeewwwww! NOT  female poster though.  whew u scared me. But now if it were Sam I might reconsider. >:D ;)

 :boxing; :boxing; Back off of my man Sluff (unless you got some serious money, then we can talk) ;) :P  ::)
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....and i think to myself, what a wonderful world....

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Sluff
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« Reply #5 on: August 30, 2007, 10:47:47 AM »

The ideal Social Worker would give me some spending money at every visit. Maybe rub my back legs and feet.   :oops; did I type that out loud?

Umm, Sluff? Doesn't MSW stand for "Male Social Worker"   :rofl;  I'd pay to see that massage allrighty  :popcorn;



eeeewwwww! NOT  female poster though.  whew u scared me. But now if it were Sam I might reconsider. >:D ;)

 :boxing; :boxing; Back off of my man Sluff (unless you got some serious money, then we can talk) ;) :P  ::)

But I still have the PM to prove you owe me.. :rofl; >:D
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KT0930
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« Reply #6 on: August 30, 2007, 10:57:59 AM »

y'all are no help at all. :urcrazy;  :banghead;
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"Dialysis ain't for sissies" ~My wonderful husband
~~~~~~~
I received a 6 out of 6 antigen match transplant on January 9, 2008. Third transplant, first time on The List.
Sluff
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« Reply #7 on: August 30, 2007, 12:22:02 PM »

y'all are no help at all. :urcrazy;  :banghead;

Sorry hon.. ;)
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momoftwo
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« Reply #8 on: August 30, 2007, 12:46:31 PM »

Hi, do you currently have a BSW?  I have a BSW and have considered going back to school for the same exact reasons.  I recently left the social service field to stay at home. 

Jenny
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KT0930
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« Reply #9 on: August 30, 2007, 01:29:57 PM »

Hi, do you currently have a BSW?

No, I have a BS in psychology (yes, I have a BS in BS)
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"Dialysis ain't for sissies" ~My wonderful husband
~~~~~~~
I received a 6 out of 6 antigen match transplant on January 9, 2008. Third transplant, first time on The List.
Black
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« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2007, 03:52:31 PM »

Hi, do you currently have a BSW?

No, I have a BS in psychology (yes, I have a BS in BS)

 :rofl; :rofl; :rofl;

On a more serious note, I'm not a SW, but before you spend all of that time and $$$, I would advise deciding if you are going to be able to handle the job without "burn-out" in a year or two.  Empathy with patients dealing with chronic disease can be very wearing.  I believe you have to be a very happy person who can walk out the door and leave it all at work.  But, while at work, pour your heart and soul into caring for your patients.  :twocents;
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Lorelle

Husband Mike Diagnosed with PKD Fall of 2004
Fistula Surgery  1/06
Fistula Revision  11/06
Creatinine 6.9  1/07
Started diaysis 2/5/07 on NxStage
KT0930
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« Reply #11 on: August 31, 2007, 06:30:50 PM »

You make a good point, Black, and that's the kind of thing I was asking for, as well as specifics to the job.
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"Dialysis ain't for sissies" ~My wonderful husband
~~~~~~~
I received a 6 out of 6 antigen match transplant on January 9, 2008. Third transplant, first time on The List.
renalsw
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« Reply #12 on: September 18, 2007, 08:59:28 AM »

:thumbup;  I have been a social worker in dialysis since 2001.  I really love what I do.  I must admit that there are times that I don't have the answers to the patients' concerns, but I will research and try to find the answers or someone who has them.  I have other social work experience but dialysis as been the most rewarding.  I can actually see the results of what I do.  It all involves counseling, helping get insurance, meds, transportation, medical equipment, etc.

I won't say it is always easy but I am willing to drive one and a half hours one way 5 days a week to take care of my patients.  NO, not every patient expresses gratitude for what we accomplish.  But one smile will often make my day.
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groggy
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« Reply #13 on: October 04, 2007, 09:45:08 PM »

Hi KT,  I have been in the medical social work field for 18 years. I have done it all ( acute hospital, rehab, hospice and dialysis).  I love being a social worker and advocating for my patients. I am a person who is totally devoted to the patient and not afraid to butt heads with the politics of a system. I am quite burned out at this time. It is not the patients, it's the organizations that are more interested in making money than serving the patient.  If  you can find your niche in dialysis social work it can be wonderful but if you don't, life can be miserable.
The average case load for a social worker is 85-100 patients.  The state does not regulate ratios. In the unit I worked in we were pushed  (harrased) to make sure everyone had funding. A dialysis unit can discharge a patient who does not have funding or  if they deem  them a behavior problem. Guess who gets to tell someone they can no longer dialyze??? The social worker!  I personally had a difficult time keeping up with all the paper work,  sometimes the roles in a unit are blurry, in that the administrative assistant or manager is suppose to help the social worker but many refuse adding more of a work load.  I could go on and on but the bottom line is that it is not as easy as it looks and corporate people think of you as funding manager not a patient advocate.

BUT, I have to say, I think you would be a great social worker because you totally understand the difficulties and barriers individuals with chronic illness' have to endure. I have talked to dialysis social workers who found the perfect place  with a private owned center rather than the huge money sucking corporations. Follow your heart, if you want to be a social worker, be one.  Even if dialysis does not work for you, you may find your spot in another area, still having the knowlege and compasion for those dealing with chronic illnesses. In the past couple of  years I have been battling cancer and I can tell you from experience. I have a much better understanding of what it's like and it changed my life and how I see patients now. I just had to sit in those chairs on and off for six months.... How do you all do it?????
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jberdahl
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« Reply #14 on: May 25, 2008, 08:40:22 PM »

Hi.  I'm an MSW at a dialysis unit, but only on the job about two months so far.  Prior experience is nursing home, assisted living, and hospital based.  I got my MSW so there would be an actual job at the end of my education.  The money is much better at MSW level, obviously.  MSW is required for work at a dialysis unit, but the requirements for a social worker at a center are slim.  I only have two federally regulated requirements, thats why social workers are running around playing bingo and acting like idiots. . .we can't figure out how to fill our time!   :secret;  Don't tell anyone i said that!!   
Anyway, i'm definitely glad i got my MSW.  My income is way above what it used to be.  All of my MSW experience has been at the management level or is extremely autonomous.  I have had more freedom, and more say since i got my degree. 
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David13
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« Reply #15 on: May 26, 2008, 05:54:57 AM »

I only have two federally regulated requirements, thats why social workers are running around playing bingo and acting like idiots. . .we can't figure out how to fill our time! :secret; Don't tell anyone i said that!!

Wow. . .that clears up quite a few questions. 

Why don't you try helping the rest of the staff that is running around like chickens with their heads cut off during some of your free time?  I am talking about just simple things, and I am sure any help would be very much appreciated. 
« Last Edit: May 26, 2008, 10:40:34 AM by David13 » Logged

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