I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
October 22, 2019, 03:47:35 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
528885 Posts in 33254 Topics by 12317 Members
Latest Member: Caregivingsister
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Dialysis Discussion
| |-+  Dialysis: Pre-Dialysis (Moderator: KarenInWA)
| | |-+  How bad did it get.
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: How bad did it get.  (Read 664 times)
jambo101
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 134

« on: December 05, 2018, 06:40:13 AM »

How bad did the symptoms of kidney failure get before you started dialysis and how soon after starting dialysis did you feel much better?

Thanks
Logged

Jim
iolaire
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1711


« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2018, 06:52:09 AM »

I never got as bad as you describe, but I napped a lot less after starting dialysis.  Pre dialysis on the weekends I could almost get up, have breakfast and then in a bit want a nap, but workdays I worked normal days.

I've not commented on most of your posts, but based on what I've read (each time), Iíve wonder if itís not time for you to start?  My nephrologist always said I'd know when itís time to start dialysis, and that the labs only mean so much, everyone is different.  Obviously starting dialysis is a big change, but if you feel like crap there is a good chance that you will feel better.

I also believe that having a bit of kidney function might help as you start dialysis.  For example if you are still peeing it gives you some time to learn about the fluid restrictions and prepare for the day when have to control fluid (and diet).

Good luck.
Logged

Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
Simon Dog
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3200


« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2018, 08:38:16 AM »

My MD tells me that starting Hemo as late as possible has the best long-term outcome, but that patients can benefit from starting PD somewhat earlier as it helps preserve residual renal function (whereas HD tends to kill off residual function)..

I remember puking on the LV strip after breakfast when I was on PD but it was starting to fail me.
Logged
fightingPKD
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 17


« Reply #3 on: June 06, 2019, 05:38:52 AM »

Late to this party, but FWIW, I'm not going on dialysis until I absolutely have no choice.
I'm planning home hemo (I don't think perio is an option for me for health reasons).

I'm currently in stage 4 now but other than occasional bouts of very real fatigue (sometimes lasting days - again, unusual but I had a bout a month ago), and uncommon lower leg cramping, I'm in pretty solid shape. 
Staying active - walking 10k steps a day, doing yoga once/twice a week, weightlifting three times a week. I've been fighting my own demise for years, squeezing all the quality of life I can out of my body.

Logged
Michelle2016
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 112

« Reply #4 on: June 06, 2019, 08:34:07 AM »

Hi, fightingPKD:

Your story or experience is really inspiring.  I was in your shoes 20 years ago. But at that time I didnít have enough education or internet to grab the information. I was very panic and did nothing, did 2 year dialysis, desperately just waiting for kidney transplant. Now Iím addicted to exercise. I spend at least 3 hours exercises if Iím not work. Exercises help me overcome depression and anxiety.

Keep fighting. Best wishes.
Logged
fightingPKD
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 17


« Reply #5 on: June 06, 2019, 09:19:13 AM »

Hi, fightingPKD:

Your story or experience is really inspiring.  I was in your shoes 20 years ago. But at that time I didnít have enough education or internet to grab the information. I was very panic and did nothing, did 2 year dialysis, desperately just waiting for kidney transplant. Now Iím addicted to exercise. I spend at least 3 hours exercises if Iím not work. Exercises help me overcome depression and anxiety.

Keep fighting. Best wishes.

Thank you so much!  If I can motivate anyone on this sub then I am happy to do so.  One thing we're all in common - we're all in a fight we didn't ask for.

Yeah, the funny thing about the steps. I only walk. I don't do cardio (running joke with my wife, who also lifts with me), but it actually started 3 months ago in an attempt to lose some weight. Not a lot, mind you - I just snuck up to 175 lbs over the holidays and auto-pilot diet wasn't working. Mid-March I decided to ramp up my light cardio and dial back my alcohol consumption (which wasn't massive, but sometimes, I'd have a drink 4-5 nights a week).  I wanted to get down to 165, which I feel is the best weight for me (I've been lighter, but I just don't look good).  Basically losing weight by mostly ramping up calorie burning.  This is a particularly good way for women to lose weight since they are always working with less calories for maintenance to begin with - generally 400-600 calories less than a man at the same age and weight.

As to why no cardio, it's because I just can't do both, I do have real recovery limitations. I push myself really hard and I feel it's honestly benefitted me, but I AM 46, and as fit as I may be, there are hard limits that can only be pushed so much, so often.

Anyhow, about 3 months in, and it's working as planned. I weighed 168 last week.  4-5 more pounds to go then I'll settle in, keep the walking up and go a little easier on my eating/drinking.
Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!