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Author Topic: Article about vegetarian protein products(Phos & Pot) and renal folks  (Read 1096 times)
kickingandscreaming
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« on: November 02, 2018, 10:00:07 AM »

https://www.jrnjournal.org/article/S1051-2276(17)30151-6/fulltext

Decent chart of nutrients including phosphorus and potassium







EDITED: Moved to main diet and recipes section-kitkatz,Admin
« Last Edit: December 15, 2018, 11:40:27 PM by kitkatz » Logged

Diagnosed with Stage 2 ESRD 2009
Pneumonia 11/15
Began Hemo 11/15 @6%
Began PD 1/16 (manual)
Began PD (Cycler) 5/16
kristina
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« Reply #1 on: November 02, 2018, 10:08:11 AM »

Many thanks K&S for providing this most reassuring article, it is very much appreciated.
Thanks again from Kristina. :grouphug;

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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
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enginist
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« Reply #2 on: November 20, 2018, 05:14:31 PM »

Kristina--

I went vegetarian six or seven weeks ago.  It was easier than I thought, although I'm probably not as strict as you.  I allow myself a free meal once per week, which usually includes a second helping.  I also use protein bars and shakes as long as they're low in the three other restricted ingredients.  I haven't had any lab tests yet, but I did lose about ten pounds without even trying.  Not that I needed to lose them, but it means that I can eat quantity as well as quality.  I'm hoping that a meatless diet arrests or reverses the recent decline in my GFR.
« Last Edit: November 20, 2018, 07:07:41 PM by enginist » Logged
Charlie B53
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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2018, 06:17:41 AM »


I absolutely LOVE Pea Pods.  Fresh in salads or cooked in anything.  Too bad they are seasonal and not in my local stores more often or I would eat more of them.

Half way through the article I started thinking a cock pot of thick split pea soup was starting to sound really good.

That ended when I got to the line about Purines.  With my Gout that would be a huge problem.

I've often wondered about the benefits of a vegetarian diet but I am stuck eating mostly meats.  A single steak or thick pork chop and I and done.  Lunch or dinner, that is about all I eat.  I know it isn't the healthiest and I really need to add more veggies.  I rarely have a salad as with the Wife now in a Nursing Home it is just me.  I never learned how to fix anything small.  I learned to cook for 6 or 7 so everything is done pretty much large scale.

My breakfast is usually only my one large cup of coffee and a blueberry muffin.  Sometimes I fix a slice of toast and eggs instead but not very often.

I do add a heaping spoon of vanilla protein powder to my coffe.  It works a lot like a creamer and gives me that little bit of protein to my daily diet.  Can't hurt I hope.

I'm still learning.  But I got a long way to go yet.
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kristina
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« Reply #4 on: November 26, 2018, 10:11:26 PM »

Kristina--

I went vegetarian six or seven weeks ago.  It was easier than I thought, although I'm probably not as strict as you.  I allow myself a free meal once per week, which usually includes a second helping.  I also use protein bars and shakes as long as they're low in the three other restricted ingredients.  I haven't had any lab tests yet, but I did lose about ten pounds without even trying.  Not that I needed to lose them, but it means that I can eat quantity as well as quality.  I'm hoping that a meatless diet arrests or reverses the recent decline in my GFR.
Please watch your potassium intake and the best of luck, your body will be grateful ...
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Bach was no pioneer; his style was not influenced by any past or contemporary century.
  He was completion and fulfillment in itself, like a meteor which follows its own path.
                                        -   Robert Schumann  -

                                          ...  Oportet Vivere ...
Marilee
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« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2019, 08:31:08 AM »

When I was studying the database for protein and phosphorus, I noticed that Garbanzo Beans (or Chickpeas) have more protein-to-phosphorus and less potassium that other beans or peas. When I ran the ratio numbers and then factored in 'absorbability' guidelines, garbanzo beans (canned, washed in water and drained) when combined with something like wheat flatbread is about the same as chicken - a really good source of protein without too much phosphorus or potassium. That makes hummus on crackers a great renal-safe snack, and a sprinkle of garbanzos on salad is a better choice than shredded cheese. :) .
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As my hubby would say, "Don't let what you can't do get in the way of what you can."
cassandra
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« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2019, 12:45:34 PM »

When I was studying the database for protein and phosphorus, I noticed that Garbanzo Beans (or Chickpeas) have more protein-to-phosphorus and less potassium that other beans or peas. When I ran the ratio numbers and then factored in 'absorbability' guidelines, garbanzo beans (canned, washed in water and drained) when combined with something like wheat flatbread is about the same as chicken - a really good source of protein without too much phosphorus or potassium. That makes hummus on crackers a great renal-safe snack, and a sprinkle of garbanzos on salad is a better choice than shredded cheese. :) .




Absolutely fantastic news!!!
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I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left

1983 high proteinloss in urine, chemo, stroke,coma, dialysis
1984 double nephrectomy
1985 transplant from dad
1998 lost dads kidney, start PD
2003 peritineum burst, back to hemo
2012 start Nxstage home hemo
       still on waitinglist, still ok I think
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