I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 20, 2018, 08:51:18 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
524885 Posts in 32909 Topics by 12182 Members
Latest Member: Iluvkidneys87
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Dialysis Discussion
| |-+  Dialysis: Pre-Dialysis (Moderator: KarenInWA)
| | |-+  HD side effects
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: 1 [2] Go Down Print
Author Topic: HD side effects  (Read 893 times)
enginist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

« Reply #25 on: November 01, 2018, 12:30:41 PM »

I can run.  I prefer the shorter distances, like the quarter-mile or the hundred-yard dash.  I'm motivated and exhilarated by trance or techno music, which has a propulsive rate of 180 bpm.  And once when I was in the park, a bright little dog came up to me and made it clear by his eyes and stance that he was challenging me to a race.  So we raced to the fence where his owners were, and the dog beat me by a tail.  But he didn't have CKD.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2018, 12:49:28 PM by enginist » Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2048


« Reply #26 on: November 01, 2018, 09:57:41 PM »

I can run.  I prefer the shorter distances, like the quarter-mile or the hundred-yard dash.  I'm motivated and exhilarated by trance or techno music, which usually has a rate of 180 bpm.  And once when I was in the park, a bright little dog came up to me and made it clear by his eyes  and stance that he was challenging me to a race.  So we raced to the fence where his owners were, and the dog beat me by a length.  But he didn't have CKD.

 :rofl;

You must be over 40. I haven't ran the 100 yard dash since the late 70's when they converted to the metric system. I'm past 50 now and could only run in case of fire.  ::)
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
enginist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

« Reply #27 on: November 02, 2018, 12:27:04 PM »

I am over 40.  70 to be exact.  I like doing all-out sprints, but CKD has had a pronounced effect on my speed, strength, and endurance.  It also has made high temperatures more of a factor. I did a 5K this summer, and it was brutal.  I'd be embarrassed to tell you my time. On the other hand, these brisk fall days are perfect for running.  But it's really the music that keeps me going.  It's all in the music.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2018, 07:46:14 PM by enginist » Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2048


« Reply #28 on: November 02, 2018, 06:40:51 PM »

I am over 40.  70 to be exact.  I like doing all-out sprints, but CKD has had a large effect on my speed, strength, and endurance.  It also has made high temperatures more of a factor. I did a 5K this summer, and it was brutal.  I'd be embarrassed to tell you my time. On the other hand, these brisk fall days are perfect for running.  But it's really the music that keeps me going.  It's all in the music.


Embarrassed about your time running over 3 miles??? Lordy! HD side effects? WHAT side effects?!  :bow;
My husband is 60 and on dialysis 3x week. The both of you have more strength and energy than I do! Right now I couldn't even WALK 3 miles. I can sure use you guys for inspiration and not even need the techno music. 
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
enginist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

« Reply #29 on: November 02, 2018, 07:53:25 PM »

Yeah, like your husband, I have a lot of energy.  I lost some for a while, but it's coming back again.  It's good to know that your husband hasn't been derailed by his dialysis treatments.  Like Cowdog and Kristina, he keeps going.  Charlie, too, has been around forever.  Cassandra is a veteran.  And Bill Peckham.  MooseMom, who must be related to Sarah Palin, doesn't seem to be slowing down.  If you go back to 2006 or 2007, it's hard not to notice that a lot of former posters are no longer with us.
« Last Edit: November 02, 2018, 09:36:32 PM by enginist » Logged
Mr Ken
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57

« Reply #30 on: November 03, 2018, 10:00:07 AM »

I have some questions about the side-effects of hemo.  The main one is, can I run?  Could I do a 5k?  The second one concerns the dialysis diet.  Is it more restrictive than the standard renal diet, which is bad enough?  Finally, would my mind be enveloped by a fog? 

Hi being realistic here I doubt if one could go out and do 5k runs while on Hemo. Hemo takes a lot out of you even the day after treatment. This process is a roller coaster ride fro your body. The best thing is to try and run working your way up to 5k.....

The fluid is the hardest part... Simple what goes in in liquid form barely comes out. So you rely on the treatments to get it out. Binders are your vitamin pills... Phosphorous builds up quickly and the treatments do not effectively dispose of the phosphates. 

Each person is different when it comes to mind fog. When I was doing hemo I noticed short term memory lapses. I did not like that because I noticed it was happening and just wondering what it is that I wanted to recall. I know that answer but I cannot think of it. Hemo is hard on the body. No sugar coating it from me.

Ken
Logged
enginist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

« Reply #31 on: November 03, 2018, 01:50:51 PM »

I believe you when you say that dialysis has a detrimental effect on the fitness level of most people.  I am sorry that you are one of them.  Others, however, seem to be not "bullet proof" but are at least "dialysis proof" in the sense that they do very well on the treatment.  I think that is due to a combination of luck, diet, the dialysis staff, and innate, intangible qualities like vitality and resilience.  I don't know where I would fit on what is probably a spectrum of physical and psychological problems.
« Last Edit: November 03, 2018, 08:58:00 PM by enginist » Logged
Mr Ken
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Posts: 57

« Reply #32 on: November 03, 2018, 06:45:16 PM »

 :laugh: I think "Well" has to be defined...... Right now I just got done filling up for the so called day time exchange...... I did not want to do it because it needs to dwell for 2.5 hours min which means I cannot tether myself to the damn machine until after 12:00AM...  Now before you go and say why did you not do it earlier.............. Lucky the machine is not in the driveway.......

Ken
Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2048


« Reply #33 on: November 03, 2018, 10:10:09 PM »

My husband is 60, works a full time semi-physical job which also involves doing a lot of complicated math. He's also put in-charge of training others. He has been on dialysis 5 years and also has diabetes. He sticks himself several times a day to check his blood sugar and again after every meal to administer his insulin. He gets tired, he gets brain fog. After 50 I think everyone does. I do and I'm not on dialysis. I've learned to write myself notes to remember things and now hubby is thinking of doing the same. Sometimes he feels "washed out" after dialysis, even if they removed less than 2 liters fluid. Sometimes he needs a nap, other days he just needs a little rest at the end of a day. Some weekends are better spent sitting back and reading a book, other weekends he runs around like a kid again. He says he feels better if he sticks to the renal diet (I cook meals using recipes from the Fresenius and Davita sites). I hate that he has to be on dialysis. I feel terrible for him. But he is doing so well that I gotta say that his energy level and attitude are incredible. I have my own health problems but nothing like his and yet, he is MY source of strength. You'd think it would be the other way around. Dialysis obviously sucks. It's a terrible, terrible thing for someone to go through. Time spent in the hospital are the worst and the ongoing stress of it all is sometimes unbearable just in itself. But there goes my husband, up and running....here, there, everywhere and he keeps going. I don't know how but he does. Perhaps one reason that might explain it is the fact that he never "stopped" his routine and has just kept going. He hasn't let diabetes and ESRD slow him down. And I know darn well that he isn't Super Man. He has no red cape and cannot leap tall buildings in a single bound. And even if he could I know he'd laugh and say "are you kidding me?". I think he keeps going because he feels he has to. That probably means that he wants to. I don't really know what explains it.
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
enginist
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 32

« Reply #34 on: November 05, 2018, 06:28:26 PM »

You're too modest to say so, PrimeTimer, but he is lucky to have you.
Logged
Pages: 1 [2] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines | Mobile View Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!