I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
April 06, 2020, 11:54:34 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
530077 Posts in 33371 Topics by 12373 Members
Latest Member: kbiel
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Dialysis Discussion
| |-+  Dialysis: Home Dialysis (Moderator: Charlie B53)
| | |-+  How to heat PD fluid in a power outage
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: How to heat PD fluid in a power outage  (Read 2081 times)
kickingandscreaming
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2268


« on: September 03, 2017, 10:39:37 AM »

With Harvey on my mind and Hurricane Irma threatening the East Coast, my thoughts go to what the h*ll I would do to warm my PD fluid in case I lost power.  Any suggestions?  I don't have a generator.
Logged

Diagnosed with Stage 2 ESRD 2009
Pneumonia 11/15
Began Hemo 11/15 @6%
Began PD 1/16 (manual)
Began PD (Cycler) 5/16
cassandra
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 4864


When all else fails run in circles, shout loudly

« Reply #1 on: September 03, 2017, 01:26:13 PM »

I would try to get to the nearest clinic/hosp to plug in the heater and do manuals. I've also done manuals without heating them. Pretty uncomfy but doable. You could also warm some bags (manuals) and keep them warm in a coolbox ?

I really hope Harvey and Irma will loose all their strength soon, where ever they are.

Good luck, love and strength, Cas
Logged

I started out with nothing and I still have most of it left

1983 high proteinloss in urine, chemo, stroke,coma, dialysis
1984 double nephrectomy
1985 transplant from dad
1998 lost dads kidney, start PD
2003 peritineum burst, back to hemo
2012 start Nxstage home hemo
       still on waitinglist, still ok I think
iolaire
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1807


« Reply #2 on: September 03, 2017, 01:47:02 PM »

Feel free to tell me if this is bad advice.

So I have a small two burner camp stove (think it was under $30 at Walmart) in the attic that uses those small propane or maybe butane gas canisters. I'd move that outside (never inside) and warm up a large pasta pot of water up to just above desired temperature, then move it off the heat and put the bags in there to warm. Again don't warm on the lit stove so as to not burn the bags and error on the side of not hot enough versus to hot.  Also I'd be worried about contamination of the bag entry points so something would need to be done to disinfect those once exposed to water.
Logged

Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2240


« Reply #3 on: September 03, 2017, 01:54:39 PM »

I don't know if I should suggest this because I'm not a "PD" person and don't know how you would keep the bags from being contaminated but...what about wrapping up the bags and placing them next to your dog? A dog's temp is much higher than a human's and I remember how ours use to keep us warm during the winters. He'd sleep up on the bed between us and felt like a firelog. Actually helped with my aches and pains from Fibromyalgia.   
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
kickingandscreaming
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 2268


« Reply #4 on: September 03, 2017, 02:38:48 PM »

Quote
So I have a small two burner camp stove (think it was under $30 at Walmart) in the attic that uses those small propane or maybe butane gas canisters. I'd move that outside (never inside) and warm up a large pasta pot of water up to just above
Quote
desired temperature, then move it off the heat and put the bags in there to warm. Again don't warm on the lit stove so as to not burn the bags and error on the side of not hot enough versus to hot.  Also I'd be worried about contamination of the bag entry points so something would need to be done to disinfect those once exposed to water.

I'm afraid that submerging the bags in warm water is frowned upon.

Quote
would try to get to the nearest clinic/hosp to plug in the heater and do manuals.

A good idea, but what if the roads were impassable?
Logged

Diagnosed with Stage 2 ESRD 2009
Pneumonia 11/15
Began Hemo 11/15 @6%
Began PD 1/16 (manual)
Began PD (Cycler) 5/16
Cupcake
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 211

a good year for Chevys

« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2017, 05:58:36 PM »

Slightly off topic but related- I assume it's not wise to keep hooked up to the cycler during a bad lightening storm. I couldn't find anything in the manual, but I unplugged the machine for about an hour a couple of days ago when we had a doozie lightening storm ( coastal South Carolina) as I was awake anyway. Goes to figure if it can 'fry' a refrigerator, it could fry me via that electrolyte filled hose. What do others do?
Logged

PD for 2 years then living donor transplant October 2018.
iolaire
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1807


« Reply #6 on: September 03, 2017, 06:00:34 PM »

I'm afraid that submerging the bags in warm water is frowned upon.

Use stove to heat something like dry beans rather than water, wrap warm beans in a towel then nest bags against towels with connections safe.
Logged

Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3440


« Reply #7 on: September 03, 2017, 06:39:47 PM »


Warm water can still be safe IF the PD bag is still sealed inside of it's outer bag.  The warm beans while certainly a neat idea, may be difficult as you would need to constantly stir them to prevent burning those on the bottom.  With no water in the pan only those in direct contact with the pan would warm.

Inside a clean pillowcase next to the dogs is an excellent idea.

Laying in the sun, anywhere. Sunny windowsill or auto dashboard even better as sunlight through glass is more long-wave (heat) than direct sunlight. Definitely not so hot after dark. In the Winter, the auto windshield defroster may work if you have enough gas to keep it running.  Keep checking temp as some can get far too hot!

Some have held the bag under their shirt in an armpit and used their own body heat.
Logged
sahern
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 84


Frozen in Alaska

« Reply #8 on: September 03, 2017, 11:06:37 PM »

What the clinic said to do when I go hunting is put them in a sleeping with you.  What I have done on trips up north is put the bags on the heater of the truck and it gets it warm enough so it is not uncomfortable.
Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.17 | SMF © 2019, Simple Machines | Terms and Policies Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!