I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
November 17, 2017, 10:23:10 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
516309 Posts in 32240 Topics by 11715 Members
Latest Member: Runwhtubrung
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Off-Topic
| |-+  Diabetes (Moderator: Vt Big Rig)
| | |-+  Foot Exams Are A Good Idea
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Foot Exams Are A Good Idea  (Read 629 times)
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1793


« on: April 24, 2017, 09:20:56 PM »

At my husband's clinic, Fresenius has begun checking everyone's feet once a month. He's diabetic so I am glad they do this. They told him his feet looked good but are a little dry. I got him some Gold Bond foot cream. I rub a little dab on his feet after he steps out of the shower. We know the devastation that even the tiniest sore can cause. When he was laid off from his desk job, he took a temp job parking and washing cars for a car rental company at the airport. He stood in water all day. He got a tiny little sore on the bottom of one toe and after a few weeks, it was still there. So, he showed it to his Endocrinologist who immediately sent him to a Podiatrist. He ended up having the tip of the toe amputated because there was a small spot of bone infection detected on the MRI. The Podiatrist saved his life! And his leg! Needless to say, he left that job. Wet feet on a diabetic all day is a recipe for infection/amputation. When you're a Diabetic, you can't pay enough attention to your feet...keep them clean and dry and examine them in a hand mirror or have someone do it for you to check for any little sores because even the tiniest of ones can lead to bone infection and loss of limb. 
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2575


« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2017, 02:13:45 AM »


Wow, He is fortunate that it was found and dealt with before it got worse.

I had a nagging 'tender' spot alonside a toenail that had been bothering me weeks.  I called in and Nurse got me an appt within a couple of days rather than the VA's usual almost a month.  The Foot Dr said it was in-grown, not enough to be infected as yet, but it very soon would have.

I was surprised as I am very careful with my toenails.  I 'file' the corners, rounding them so they cannot 'dig' in and cause an in-grown.  I do NOT clip any nails as you can get too short too easily.  I file.  I only use a good triple cut file.  No 'boards'.

In my early teens, I used to 'bite' them all, toes too.  Once I learned to file I've always had half decent nails, for a Man.
Logged
iolaire
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1072


« Reply #2 on: April 25, 2017, 06:00:31 AM »

My DaVita clinic started that up at some point but they have not done it to me for some time.  Hopefully that's just because I remind them that I'm not diabetic.  I hope they are checking the diabetics and helping them keep healthy.  All those diabetics foot problems are scary...
Logged

Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
Michael Murphy
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1483


« Reply #3 on: April 25, 2017, 06:16:24 AM »

Just before starting.  dialysis I went infor my monthly predialysis blood wok like a Idiot I got up in the middle of the night And  drank a coke( those were the good old days)  I also forgot I did it. Second mistake, so I started dialysis with a diagnosted case of diabetes.  Despite a monthly perfect A1C it took a year to get it changed.  Now I am enormously ticklish so every month I would be screaming and laughing.  The nurses were enjoying emencely.  I guess they thought it was funny.  Even after getting the diagnosis changed if I was asleep I would wake up screaming and laughing the nurses would claim they forgot.  One of of the happiest days of my life was when thy finally stopped checking my feet although till this day I will occasionally be foot vhecked.
Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1793


« Reply #4 on: April 25, 2017, 12:53:39 PM »

Good way to check the bottom of your own feet is to use a hand mirror. One tiny sore can act as an opening for infection to travel up the bone. And you don't have to wait for the sore to get very big to cause trouble, so pay close attention to your feet! Diabetic or not, I would think all people on dialysis may be susceptible to slower healing times and infection. Diabetics have to keep their blood sugar levels down because bacteria loves to feed on sugar. And warm moist places.
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2575


« Reply #5 on: April 25, 2017, 07:31:09 PM »


Diabetics lose the nerve sensitivity in the feet without knowing it.  Most simply can NOT feel a sore, open wound, infection, those things that a 'Normal' person would have noticed long ago and looked to find out why.  The Diabetic doesn't have a clue.

I was so very surprised when the Diabetic Nurse Specialist got out that tuning fork.  Sure, I know what a tuning fork is.  I could HEAR it, felt it on my hand.

DIDN'T FEEL A THING on my feet.  Oh, I could feel the touch, but NOT the vibration.   Talk about DUMBFOUNDED.   I was STUNNED.

I check my feet now.

Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1793


« Reply #6 on: June 16, 2017, 09:33:57 PM »

Charlie, maybe you can ask the VA to check your feet for you. Hubby's podiatrist has some new equipment to test for neuropathy in his hands and feet.....he just sat there and put his hands on some gadget on a table while putting his feet flat below him on a special monitor mat. Didn't use the tuning fork. Hopefully the VA has this new equipment.
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2575


« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2017, 04:24:46 AM »


The lack of sensation without ever noticing it sure is a huge surprise.  Realization that some little thing could cause the need for amputation.  It's downright scary.

I suspect the loss of sensation may also occur in some other older people that are NOT diabetic.  This could occur as an age deterioration thing with the nervous system.

EVERYONE should pay a bit better attention to their feet.

Women still grow up liking some of those pointy-toed shoes, or wearing the wrong size, crowding toes, causing permanent toe deformities.  This need not happen and is easily preventable with simply wearing correct fitting shoes.  Parents need to teach them better.
Logged
smartcookie
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 450


LMSW

« Reply #8 on: June 19, 2017, 08:49:25 AM »

Diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease are both awful and can make you loose feeling in your feet.  I had a patient that soaked her feet in warm Epsom salt water and burned her foot without knowing it.  She ended up getting her leg amputated.  It was terrible.  I have a young patient that just started and has lost both legs and most of his fingers.  It is no joke to get a cut or infection as a diabetic. 
Logged

I am a renal social worker.  I am happy to help answer questions, but please talk to your clinic social worker for specifics on your particular situation.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2575


« Reply #9 on: June 20, 2017, 05:02:56 AM »


20 y.o. in the Army and planning a football career once I got out, I was crushed almost losing a leg after a motorcycle accident.  I had decided on suicide if the leg came off.  I am so glad it didn't as I was that young and foolish.

Even now almost 50 years later, the loss of a limb would be a traumatic event.

I check my feeet, but I never thought about my hands.  As a lifelong mechanic I am always bashing my hands, arms, many times even my calves attempting to get my body into a better position to get a grip on something.

Fortunately for me I usually heal well and I do Believe that my near constant exposure to 'things' help keep my resistance up.  Although there are a goodly number of seriously 'bad' bacteria out there just laying in wait for an opportunity to grow in somebody.

Stay careful.  Wash your hands!

Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.14 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines | Mobile View Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!