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Author Topic: Canola Oil vs Coconut Oil  (Read 3569 times)
PrimeTimer
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« on: March 28, 2017, 01:59:26 PM »

I've been sauteing veggies with canola oil. Hubby asked for that. It lowers triglycerides. Now I've done a little reading on coconut oil. Confused as to which one is better. Any thoughts? 
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #1 on: March 28, 2017, 05:05:58 PM »

IMO Coconut oil is a far superior oil.  Canola is almost always genetically modified (unless organic) and therefore to be avoided.  Here are a couple of paragraphs from a web article comparing a whole bunch of oils.

Canola Oil/Rapeseed Oil

Canola oil is derived from rapeseeds, but the euric acid (a toxic, bitter substance) has been removed from it.

The fatty acid breakdown of canola oil is actually fairly good, with most of the fatty acids monounsaturated, then containing Omega-6 and Omega-3 in a 2:1 ratio, which is perfect.

However, canola oil needs to go through very harsh processing methods before it is turned into the final product.

Check out this video to see how canola oil is made. It is very disgusting and involves the toxic solvent hexane (among others) – I personally don’t think these oils are suitable for human consumption.

---------------------------
Coconut Oil

When it comes to high heat cooking, coconut oil is your best choice.

Over 90% of the fatty acids in it are saturated, which makes it very resistant to heat.

This oil is semi-solid at room temperature and it can last for months and years without going rancid.

Coconut oil also has powerful health benefits. It is particularly rich in a fatty acid called Lauric Acid, which can improve cholesterol and help kill bacteria and other pathogens (2, 3, 4).

The fats in coconut oil can also boost metabolism slightly and increase feelings of fullness compared to other fats. It is the only cooking oil that made it to my list of superfoods (5, 6, 7).

https://authoritynutrition.com/healthy-cooking-oils/
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PrimeTimer
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« Reply #2 on: March 28, 2017, 06:39:56 PM »

K&S: Thanks for the info and providing the link! I'm thinking now of trying coconut oil. Wonder if it tastes like coconut. Canola oil has no real taste to it but olive oil on the other hand, has a very distinct flavor (and not one that goes with eggs in the morning). We haven't used too much of the olive oil except on salads with a little red wine vinegar. Now I must go on the hunt for coconut oil.   
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Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Charlie B53
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« Reply #3 on: March 29, 2017, 03:40:35 AM »


Great article, I will be passing this link on to Family.

I grew up learning to cook using Crisco, and not sure where it was listed.  Was it included in the 'Animal Fat' section along with lard?

Corn/vegetable oils have been pushed on the public for well over a generation already.

I only recently saw Coconut Oil on the shelf in the store and was curious about it.  My cupboard contains veg, a couple olives, canola, and peanut.  I grab whichever one my mood happens to be as being just a 'Guy' I never knew much about the differences.  I may have to re-figure my priorities.
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PrimeTimer
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« Reply #4 on: March 29, 2017, 09:42:51 AM »

Well...hubby and I discussed changing to coconut oil and he says NO WAY. He hates all things coconut. Our store does carry it but it costs $16 for a mere 10 ounces. We'd go thru that in no time so that's not very practical. But he seriously hates coconut. I use canola oil to saute onions and bell peppers (red, yellow, green) before adding them to his omelets. He loves them that way. I also use it whenever a recipe calls for it. I've been cooking strictly using low sodium/potassium/phosphorous recipes from the Fresenius and Davita sites. Some recipes call for 1 tablespoon of the canola oil. That isn't much but sure adds to the overall flavor of things. Since I've been using these recipes, his potassium has come way down and he's also been less thirsty. We wonder if it's because of less sodium in his diet and the canola oil and veggies helping to retain moisture/fluid in a way that his body utilizes it instead of retaining it in the form of edema. His clinic is impressed that he brings in very little on-board and a big plus is that his blood pressure has come down. Hhmm....something is working right. Anyways, he wants to keep the canola oil and yummy Hexane.
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Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
justagirl2325
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« Reply #5 on: March 29, 2017, 09:59:45 AM »

How does anyone hate all things coconut lol.  Coconut's rock.  That being said...I've never tried coconut oil (sounds weird to me, like almond milk...how does one milk an almond).  Don't mind me, my mind is turning to mush, working too much.
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #6 on: March 29, 2017, 11:38:32 AM »

Extra virgin Coc. oil has a mild coconut taste.  The refined version is quite bland.  Prices aren't bad. Check out Amazon and do a search for refined coconut oil.
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PrimeTimer
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« Reply #7 on: March 29, 2017, 08:47:59 PM »

How does anyone hate all things coconut lol.  Coconut's rock.  That being said...I've never tried coconut oil (sounds weird to me, like almond milk...how does one milk an almond).  Don't mind me, my mind is turning to mush, working too much.

Working too much?! Instead of canola or coconut oil sounds like you need a coconut-flavored Pina Colada or Chi-Chi!!  :wine;   :bump;
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Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
PrimeTimer
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« Reply #8 on: March 30, 2017, 08:27:50 PM »

Extra virgin Coc. oil has a mild coconut taste.  The refined version is quite bland.  Prices aren't bad. Check out Amazon and do a search for refined coconut oil.

Ah-HA! Our store's website said it only carried the 10 ounce for $16 but I found it on their shelf for $7  >:D.   Hubby doesn't want it but I might try it for myself and then see if he will give it a whirl. Maybe he'd like it just for his veggies.
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Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
PrimeTimer
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« Reply #9 on: June 24, 2017, 11:52:18 AM »

Uh-oh....may be a good thing that hubby stuck with his canola oil and yummy Hexane afterall.


From the New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/22/well/the-worst-fat-in-the-food-supply.html

From Eco Watch

https://www.ecowatch.com/is-coconut-oil-healthy-2446828667.html

From Science Of US

http://nymag.com/scienceofus/2017/06/coconut-oil-is-still-fine-american-heart-association.html


From USA Today June 16, 2017

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation-now/2017/06/16/coconut-oil-isnt-healthy-its-never-been-healthy/402719001/






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Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
smartcookie
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« Reply #10 on: June 26, 2017, 01:46:19 PM »

The "experts"  are never sure with this sort of thing.  Don't eat eggs!  Yes, do eat eggs!  Don't eat coconut oil!  Yes, do eat coconut oil!  I think as long as you are eating in moderation, any type of oil is okay.  Veggie oil seems to be pretty healthy, so that is what I go with.  I put coconut oil on my hair and skin, though.  Softens it and smells yummy!!
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #11 on: June 30, 2017, 01:02:36 PM »

I don't trust this "new" pronouncement.  Here is an anakytical article by a very thoughtful professional in the field that raises some questions.

Quote
Coconut Oil Is Still Healthy, Despite AHA Claims

on June 27, 2017 by Chris Kresser

A recent AHA presidential advisory recommends yet again that we reduce our saturated fat intake to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. This time, coconut oil was added to the “avoid” list. But is it really unhealthy? Read on to learn what the research says and why we shouldn’t take this AHA report to heart.
iStock.com/marekuliasz

After reviewing four major studies, the American Heart Association (AHA) recently issued a “presidential advisory” stating that saturated fats, including coconut oil, should be avoided, recommending that they be replaced with polyunsaturated fats like canola oil, soybean oil, and corn oil (1). A presidential advisory is a report initiated by the AHA president to “address a topic of special current importance.” While this has been all over the news, the report is really nothing new. In fact, the AHA has consistently recommended the reduction in dietary saturated fat to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease since 1961 (2, 3).

I’ve previously written an extensive report on why saturated fat does not cause heart disease. I’m not going to rehash all of that in this article, so be sure to check it out if you haven’t. Instead, this article will zero in on the issues with this particular advisory and focus on the coconut oil claims in particular.
Cherry-picking studies is effective

There have been at least 17 systematic reviews and meta-analyses conducted in recent years that have not found a clear link between saturated fat consumption and heart disease. The authors themselves note in the introduction:

    “In the past few years, meta-analyses of observational studies and randomized clinical trials have come to discordant conclusions about the relationship between dietary saturated fat and risk of CVD” (1).

They then proceed to pick four core studies (4, 5, 6, 7) from these meta-analyses that they deemed to be most “well performed.” This is certainly not the first time that cherry-picking has occurred in the history of saturated fat or nutrition research. You might recall the famous “seven countries study” in which Ancel Keys, father of the saturated fat–heart disease hypothesis, picked seven of 22 countries to demonstrate an initial relationship between saturated fat and cardiovascular disease (8).

Furthermore, the publication dates of these four core studies were 1969, 1970, 1968, and 1979! The authors report that no definitive large-scale clinical trials have been conducted since then, which is true, but this represents a major public health issue. If we continue to pull up the results of the same old studies year after year to shape today’s nutrition recommendations, the AHA will continue to promote 40-year-old nutritional science for the next several decades.

    Worried about the AHA’s statement on saturated fat? Don’t be.

Industry influence in nutritional sciences

Unfortunately, nutritional sciences are rife with industry influence, and the AHA is no exception. While the AHA is a nonprofit organization, it receives significant funds from industry leaders. Representatives from companies like Nestlé, Coca-Cola, The Sugar Association, the United Soybean Board, and the US Canola Association also serve on its “Industry Nutrition Advisory Panel.” From the AHA website:

    “The American Heart Association’s Industry Nutrition Advisory Panel (INAP) is a unique, strategic relationship between the American Heart Association’s Nutrition Committee and food industry leaders. In existence since 1995, INAP provides a platform for open dialogue, sharing of information and planning cooperative programs in areas of mutual interest such as diet and nutrition and cardiovascular disease” (emphasis mine).

You can easily imagine how a few pushy industry leaders might be able to influence AHA recommendations.
The difference between statistical significance and clinical significance

Furthermore, in interpreting the findings of any study used to inform human health, it’s important to distinguish between statistical significance and clinical significance (9). In statistics, we say that a result is significant when the observed difference between treatment groups is extremely unlikely to have occurred by chance. For example, one group might have slightly higher cholesterol than another group. Clinical significance, on the other hand, is the practical importance of the observed difference in treatments. For example, does this difference actually cause heart disease?

In this case, the authors looked at clinical significance by assessing the number of actual cardiovascular events, but only for a handful of studies. The remainder of their report was built around changes in LDL cholesterol, which is only a risk factor for heart disease. They present several studies that observed changes in cholesterol ranging from 0.6 to 2.1 mg/dL after altering saturated fat intake. Yes, this is statistically significant, but can that tiny change in cholesterol make a difference in the number of clinical outcomes?

Consider the variability of cholesterol tests. One research group took repeated blood samples from the same people for cholesterol analysis over several days, without any intervention. They found that LDL cholesterol fluctuated more than 20 percent (about 17 mg/dL) in 95 percent of subjects and more than 40 percent in 45 percent of subjects (10). In other words, you could get your cholesterol tested today and be told you are in perfect health and get tested tomorrow and be recommended statins.

LDL-Cholesterol versus LDL-Particle Number

Additionally, the AHA report only discusses LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). One study found that of 136,905 coronary artery disease hospitalizations, almost half of patients presented with normal LDL-C (11). The number of LDL particles (LDL-P) is a much stronger predictor of cardiovascular disease risk than LDL cholesterol, and it’s possible to have normal LDL-C and high LDL-P (12, 13, 14). Preliminary studies comparing lipid profiles after subjects followed a low-carb, high-fat diet and a high-carb, low-fat diet suggest that saturated fat does not increase LDL-P (15).
Why we can’t rely on animal models to study lipid metabolism

The report next turns to a number of studies suggesting that saturated fat feeding in rodent and primate models results in the development of atherosclerosis. However, there are major differences in lipid metabolism between humans and rodents, and even between humans and nonhuman primates. This is a major problem with animal nutrition research.

This book chapter provides an excellent review on the evolution of human lipid metabolism:

    “To accommodate the high energy demands of our large brains, humans consume diets that are of much higher quality (i.e., more dense in energy and fat) than those of our primate kin (Leonard and Robertson, 1992, 1994). On average, we consume higher levels of dietary fat than other primates (Popovich et al., 1997).”

    The need for an energy-rich diet also appears to have shaped our ability to detect and metabolize high-fat foods. […] compared to large-bodied apes, humans have an enhanced capacity to digest and metabolize higher fat diets. Our gastrointestinal (GI) tract, with its expanded small intestine and reduced colon, is quite different from those of chimpanzees and gorillas and is consistent with the consumption of a high-quality diet with large amounts of animal food (Milton, 1987). Finch and Stanford (2004) have recently shown that the evolution of key “meat-adaptive” genes in hominid evolution were critical to promoting enhanced lipid metabolism necessary for subsisting on diets with greater levels of animal material” (16).

Simply put, we need to be very careful about translating results from animal models of lipid metabolism to humans.
Paleolithic diet improves lipid profile and CVD risk

It’s also worth noting that field studies of 20th-century hunter–gatherers found them to be largely free of cardiovascular disease symptoms and risk factors. This is despite consuming a diet that is 28 to 58 percent fat by energy, with as much as half of this coming from saturated fat (17).

Several studies have shown benefits of a modern Paleolithic-type diet on lipid profile and cardiovascular risk factors (18, 19, 20). However, most of these studies are using a Paleolithic diet that is actually lower in saturated fat than the control group. Because of this, I turned to ketogenic diets to determine the influence of very-high-fat diets on cardiovascular risk.

In a study published in the Journal of Nutrition, after six weeks of a ketogenic diet, fasting serum total and LDL cholesterol and oxidized LDL were unchanged, but HDL cholesterol tended to increase (21). This suggests a more favorable lipid profile, though due to small sample size and short duration, clinical significance could not be determined.
The proven benefits of coconut oil

Bringing our discussion back to coconut oil, the claims made in the AHA report simply don’t stand up to research. It appears the authors performed the following logic:

Premise: 4 core studies from the 1960s and ’70s → saturated fat causes heart disease

Premise: coconut oil has a high content of saturated fat

Conclusion: coconut oil causes heart disease and should be avoided

This logic relies on some faulty assumptions, namely that saturated fat causes heart disease (it doesn’t) and that all saturated fats are the same (they’re not).

Most importantly, studies have shown that coconut oil:

    Improves blood lipid profile (22, 23)
    Reduces weight circumference (24, 25)
    Is anti-inflammatory (26)
    Is antimicrobial (27)
    May promote weight loss (28)
    May improve antioxidant status (29, 30)
    May protect against Alzheimer’s disease (31, 32)

So, to sum up, don’t stress about eating coconut oil. The stress is probably more likely to give you heart disease!
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #12 on: July 01, 2017, 07:14:14 AM »


I'll stick with what I know.

I was raised using vegetable, but have switched to olive and canola.

We have a small bottle of peanut but I haven't tried it yet.

My 'tastes' are simple.  I've never tried tasting the oils to see what the differences are.  Never took the time or effort.  Maybe I should.  I could learn something.

I bet I would need a cracker or something between 'tastes' to clear remaining oil from my tongue so not to skew each taste.  Sort of 'normalize' my mouth before each.
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nursey66
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« Reply #13 on: July 01, 2017, 06:51:56 PM »

My hubby does all his own cooking , using coconut oil on crackers , pop corn, into the water for poaching eggs etc . The kind we get is Whole Body Foods from Walmart. It's organic, works for high heat cooking up to 425* and we get the largest 56oz jar for 13 bucks. I just asked him if it tastes like coconut and he replied "barely " .A doctor recommended it to him.
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #14 on: July 03, 2017, 05:36:27 AM »


Evidently the controversy over coconut oils is far wider than I imagined.  This morning (Mon July 3) the local TV station morning show (KOMO TV4 - St Louis) will be airing a piece of Coconut Oils and the Myths surrounding it.

I am in the 'Chair' and hoping I will remember to turn it on to watch.  With my luck, they will tease us, keep running little reminders of the piece but hold it till the end of the hour.

I'm usually put to sleep by all the waiting and may miss it.

Hopefully they will have it available on-line later in the day.
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