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Author Topic: In-Clinic Tech's  (Read 1521 times)
Simon Dog
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« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2017, 05:28:33 PM »

That's an incredible NT ratio.   Here in the US I see more like 8:1, with 4:1 for the techs.

As to lazy RNs - ergophobia is a disease that knows no boundary of profession, race or background, except perhaps Asians and Indians (I've never seen a lazy Asian or Indian (spot, not feather) ).
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OlManRivah
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« Reply #26 on: May 19, 2017, 06:44:13 PM »


LOL

I've already been told Do NOT Touch the machines. They won't even let me turn my chair so I can LOOK at it.

I always carry my little hand held mirror.  It's purpose is to view the machine.  Works great!      :beer1;
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Country boys can survive!
Michael Murphy
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« Reply #27 on: May 20, 2017, 01:08:50 AM »

I have never seen a nurse sit at the station and ignore a alarm.  However now and then I have seen a nurse jump up and run to a patient who was starting to get in trouble.  One of the most frightening things I have ever seen is the guy next to me was starting to drift off with low blood sugar when one of the nurses jumped up ran to a cabinet and ran to the patient with the biggest dam syringe I have ever seen. I just layer there thinking omg they are going to stick that guy with a elephant needle. Turned out she stuck it in his tubing and the effect was unreal. From pale and pasty to roses cheeks in seconds.
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GA_DAWG
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« Reply #28 on: June 24, 2017, 03:20:23 PM »

We have a really good and talented group of techs. I know they care about the patients because I have seen how hard they work to give us the best care they can. I have also seen them cry after a patient has an incident, though they try to hide it. I have tried at different times to explain to them we (the patients) all know there is a risk to what we do, but we also know the results of not getting the treatments. I do know they are denied by law being able to discuss other patients, so I usually do not ask a lot of questions. Besides, it is usually not long before another patient hears any news.
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #29 on: June 24, 2017, 04:44:55 PM »


With the number of alarms that regularly sound off, it's a wonder the Techs get a half second to breath.  But I have noticed that the Tech's in my Clinic seem to KNOW which patient and which alarm is more critical.  My machine makes noise regularly, it's no big deal, the Tech comes over, pushes a button and all is well again.  Many times it is like that with a number of patients and the Tech doesn't seem to be in any hurry. 

However.................

There are those patients that when an alarm goes off the Tech is there IMMEDIATELY.  It's like the Tech KNOWS which patient and which alarm requires an immediate response.

Experience, there is no other explanation.  These people know their business.
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kitkatz
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« Reply #30 on: June 24, 2017, 10:17:34 PM »

My chronic Low BP freaks the techs and nurses out.  The one that have been with me longest tend to not freak do much, but check in on me to see if I feel okay.
The new ones tend to hover.
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Ivanova: "Old Egyptian blessing: May God stand between you and harm in all the empty places you must walk." Babylon 5

Remember your present situation is not your final destination.

Take it one day, one hour, one minute, one second at a time.

"If we don't find a way out of this soon, I'm gonna lose it. Lose it... It means go crazy, nuts, insane, bonzo, no longer in possession of ones faculties, three fries short of a Happy Meal, wacko!" Jack O'Neill - SG-1
kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #31 on: Today at 08:52:04 AM »

Low BP always sounded good to me-- as someone who naturally runs high.  It wasn't until my BP was lowered too much by a new drug that I learned how awful low BP can  be.  I was dizzy all the time and fainted multiple times.  So it can be a big deal.  With an adjustment of the dose, my BP moved into good territory.  Thank heavens.
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Diagnosed with Stage 2 ESRD 2009
Pneumonia 11/15
Began Hemo 11/15 @6%
Began PD 1/16 (manual)
Began PD (Cycler) 5/16
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