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Author Topic: Veggie/Vegan Meat on Renal Diet  (Read 2689 times)
Fabkiwi06
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« on: June 15, 2016, 06:56:59 PM »

Does anyone eat veggie burgers/fake meat here? Pre kidney failure, I was mostly veggie, but unfortunetly the ones I used to love are super high in sodium. Are there any brands that work within our lower limits?

I ask, because one of the biggest things I miss since having to switch to the renal diet is bacon. I know it's a major no-no food with the high sodium and fat content. Some of my vegan friends have been raving about the Lightlife Smart Bacon and how it's almost as good as the real thing. At a quick glace, the nutrition looks ok as long it's not an every day thing.

http://lightlife.com/products/smart-bacon - if you're interested.
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SooMK
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2016, 05:08:53 AM »

I make my own veggie burgers. My favorite recipe is from Cooks Magazine which uses black beans but there are a lot of recipes out there. It does call for a 1/4 cup of crushed taco chips but you could use some with lower salt. They freeze well too. I haven't had bacon in a long time but I miss it too. I tried a recipe for bacon made with mushrooms but it was a lot of work and not that great. I have another recipe for mushroom bacon but haven't tried it yet. I'll wait for the intense longing to surface again.
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SooMK
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #2 on: June 16, 2016, 06:31:14 AM »



Stupid question, perhaps.

What if we could leach some of the salt out of the bacon, and maybe a little bit of the fat, by boiling it a few minutes before frying.

I made fresh green beans in the microwave with bacon.  The bacon didn't cook like it would have if simmered on the stove top for hours.  The color didn't change much and only a little of the fat melted out, leaving it looking pretty much a lot like original.

This makes me wonder of boiling whole slices would leach out some of the salt, depending on how much water is use, more water would pull more salt.   Then lay the slices in a cool skillet and start raising the temp.  I think starting at cool and raising the temp moderately may give time for some of the excess water to steam off rather than flash and pop if dropped into a hot skillet.


Any Ideas?
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #3 on: June 16, 2016, 10:48:16 AM »

I don't like most fake meat because they have to do so much processing to make it that way.  I eat bacon.  Why are you trying to avoid the fat? Avoiding saturated fat is very old thinking and doesn't fit with lots of newer research. If it has been naturally and well raised, there is nothing wrong with saturated fat. And quite a lot right with it.  I get uncured bacon that is humanely raised and get several kinds with reduced sodium at Whole Foods.  Here is a blog where she reduces the salt in bacon. http://www.kitchenbutterfly.com/how-to/de-salt-bacon/  I don't eat much of it, but I don't deny myself either.  My diet is very low in carbs because I control my Type 2 diabetes that way.  But I do allow fat.  I only eat organic and preferably grass-fed meats.
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Diagnosed with Stage 2 ESRD 2009
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Began Hemo 11/15 @6%
Began PD 1/16 (manual)
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #4 on: June 16, 2016, 12:21:07 PM »


I'm tickled to see the water bath works.  Pretty much exactly what I am thinking.

I don't get my heart-rate up enough to burn very many calories.  Much less to burn off cholesterol and that has led to much of my artery clogging problems.

I do nlt need any salt.  These is far too much in most all processed foods.  And I suspect it also is a contributing factor to triggering my bouts with gout.  It may be the nitrates included, but I am thinking the water bath may reduce some of those as well.

I really miss regulart BLT's.  Heavy on the LT.  A 'Guy' has to have his vegetables, every day.  A stuffed BLT is just as good a serving of vegetables as any other.  At Least in my opinion.

Wife won't bother to even look at this screen so I'll just save this link so I can refresh my memory once in a while, and tell her about it.  I'm sure she won't bother to try it so I'll just have to get busy in the kitchen and do it.

Thanks again for the link!
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Fabkiwi06
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2016, 12:33:56 PM »

My cholesterol has been an issue as of late - so I'm trying to follow doctors orders for the first month on the new meds. And the calories... I'm not dieting per say, but let's just say that I'm beginning to pack on the pounds. That and, I don't like meat. One of the hardest things about my kidney failure has been having to eat meat again to keep my protein where it needs to be. The other hardest has been the lack of Diet Coke. *sob*

Leeching bacon is an interesting idea. I wonder how, if at all, it would effect the crispy-ness.

All things in moderation, I suppose...
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surprise kidney failure - oct. 2015
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switched to pd - dec. 2015
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kickingandscreaming
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Q
« Reply #6 on: June 17, 2016, 05:21:49 PM »

Quote
The diet-heart hypothesis—which holds that eating cholesterol and saturated fat raises cholesterol in our blood—originated with studies in both animals and humans more than half a century ago. However, more recent (and higher quality) evidence doesn’t support it.

On any given day, we have between 1,100 and 1,700 milligrams of cholesterol in our body. 25% of that comes from our diet, and 75% is produced inside of our bodies by the liver. Much of the cholesterol that’s found in food can’t be absorbed by our bodies, and most of the cholesterol in our gut was first synthesized in body cells and ended up in the gut via the liver and gall bladder. The body tightly regulates the amount of cholesterol in the blood by controlling internal production; when cholesterol intake in the diet goes down, the body makes more. When cholesterol intake in the diet goes up, the body makes less.

This explains why well-designed cholesterol feeding studies (where they feed volunteers 2-4 eggs a day and measure their cholesterol) show that dietary cholesterol has very little impact on blood cholesterol levels in about 75% of the population. The remaining 25% of the population are referred to as “hyper-responders”. In this group, dietary cholesterol does modestly increase both LDL (“bad cholesterol” and HDL (“good cholesterol”), but it does not affect the ratio of LDL to HDL or increase the risk of heart disease. (2)

In other words, eating cholesterol isn’t going to give you a heart attack. You can ditch the egg-white omelettes and start eating yolks again. That’s a good thing, since all of the 13 essential nutrients eggs contain are found in the yolk. Egg yolks are an especially good source of choline, a B-vitamin that plays important roles in everything from neurotransmitter production to detoxification to maintenance of healthy cells. (3) Studies show that up to 90% of Americans don’t get enough choline, which can lead to fatigue, insomnia, poor kidney function, memory problems and nerve-muscle imbalances. (4)

What about saturated fat? It’s true that some studies show that saturated fat intake raises blood cholesterol levels. But these studies are almost always short-term, lasting only a few weeks. (5) Longer-term studies have not shown an association between saturated fat intake and blood cholesterol levels. In fact, of all of the long-term studies examining this issue, only one of them showed a clear association between saturated fat intake and cholesterol levels, and even that association was weak. (6)

Moreover, studies on low-carbohydrate diets (which tend to be high in saturated fat) suggest that they not only don’t raise blood cholesterol, they have several beneficial impacts on cardiovascular disease risk markers. For example, a meta-analysis of 17 low-carb diet trials covering 1,140 obese patients published in the journal Obesity Reviews found that low-carb diets neither increased nor decreased LDL cholesterol. However, they did find that low-carb diets were associated with significant decreases is body weight as well as improvements in several CV risk factors, including decreases in triglycerides, fasting glucose, blood pressure, body mass index, abdominal circumference, plasma insulin and c-reactive protein, as well as an increase in HDL cholesterol. (7)

If you’re wondering whether saturated fat may contribute to heart disease in some way that isn’t related to cholesterol, a large meta-analysis of prospective studies involving close to 350,000 participants found no association between saturated fat and heart disease. (8) A Japanese prospective study that followed 58,000 men for an average of 14 years found no association between saturated fat intake and heart disease, and an inverse association between saturated fat and stroke (i.e. those who ate more saturated fat had a lower risk of stroke). (9)

That said, just as not everyone responds to dietary cholesterol in the same manner, there’s some variation in how individuals respond to dietary saturated fat. If we took ten people, fed them a diet high in saturated fat, and measured their cholesterol levels, we’d see a range of responses that averages out to no net increase or decrease. (If dietary saturated fat does increase your total or LDL cholesterol, the more important question is whether that’s a problem. I’ll address that in the next article in this series.)

Another strike against the diet-heart hypothesis is that many of its original proponents haven’t believed it for at least two decades.
http://chriskresser.com/the-diet-heart-myth-cholesterol-and-saturated-fat-are-not-the-enemy/   There's more at the link.

On a personal note, for the last several years I have been eating a low carb diet and giving myself total free rein in eating fats--mostly saturated and high quality monosaturated.  I hadn't had a cholesterol test for years, and the ones years ago before eating this way were all over 230.   When I was tested in December when I started hemo, my lipids test came in at 180.  My neph was shocked at how good it was.  And I was very pleased to see that eating that way had lowered my score rather than raised it.
----------------------

I'm not a cola person (I'm a root beer type when I indulge).  But I've found a line of sugar-free soda that is zero calorie and is sweetened with erythritol and stevia.  They're quite good IMHO.  They're called "ZEVIA" and they have a cola (I haven't tried it).  On their website they make a point to say that their sodas are safe for dialysis.  They don't contain phosphoric acid which is the no no in colas. http://www.zevia.com/checklist   I buy them locally at Whole Foods and another very ordinary supermarket, but they are also available on Amazon.
From their FAQ:
Quote
Do your sodas contain phosphoric acid?
Zip. Zilch. Nada! Zevia uses no Phosphoric Acid, making this an ideal soda option for anyone on dialysis! Need more specific info about this, calcium or potassium levels? Email us at zevia@zevia.com.
« Last Edit: June 17, 2016, 05:28:32 PM by kickingandscreaming » Logged

Diagnosed with Stage 2 ESRD 2009
Pneumonia 11/15
Began Hemo 11/15 @6%
Began PD 1/16 (manual)
Began PD (Cycler) 5/16
Charlie B53
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« Reply #7 on: June 17, 2016, 06:01:31 PM »


I gave up all soda a great many years ago.  I used to slam large Cokes morning, noon, and night, until one day the bubbles got me.  Stomach wouldn't open, throat closed, the bubbles gassed and grew, the pressure about killed me.  Actually felt I was having a heart attack and going to die.  Then the stomach opened and I could feel the pressure slide down, and all was well again.    It didn't take too many times and I switched to ice water.   To this day I rarely have any carbonated drink, including beer.

I eat LOTS of eggs.  And I would eat more fish if it were available here in the mid-West, and I don't mean catfish!   Most anything from saltwater is fine.   Got to get protein every day.  Red meat is OK but can get expensive any more.  If I had a few more acres I'd seriously be thinking about raising a couple, it would still cost but the quality would be far better than most of what we get in the stores.
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