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Author Topic: PD and septic systems  (Read 2896 times)
kickingandscreaming
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« on: April 26, 2016, 05:03:52 PM »

This is something I've been wondering about for a long time.  I've tried asking Dr. Google, but he/she's mum about it.  Every time I dump a bag of used PD fluid or the remnant of a fresh bag I wonder if I'm killing my septic system with all the sugar.  Does anyone know anything about this?
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2016, 05:45:01 PM »


The bacteria in the system FEEDS on sugar, much like yeast eating carbs.

Salt and harsh detergents are the leading causes of septic problems.  Liquid detergents/soaps are generally much milder than their powdered equivalents.   Water softeners using high quantities of salt are next.


Not to worry about PD solutions.   I have been told hummingbirds can feed on the spare solution but I haven't tried it.  I wouldn't think our used waste would be good for those itty-bitty bodies.
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Simon Dog
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« Reply #2 on: April 26, 2016, 05:57:37 PM »

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Salt and harsh detergents are the leading causes of septic problems.
And garbage disposals
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #3 on: April 26, 2016, 06:20:53 PM »

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And garbage disposals

Yup. That's why I don't have one.

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The bacteria in the system FEEDS on sugar, much like yeast eating carbs.
That makes some sense. But isn't there such a thing as too much of a good thing?
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #4 on: April 27, 2016, 06:48:41 AM »


A septic system can be compared to your digestive system.  Both dissolved whatever is put into them into the base elements and seperating the desolved from the un-dissolvable, the solids or fiber.  Only we excrete those solids and the septic systems those solids accumulate and settle in the holding tank.  Someday becoming so full of solids that a truck will have to come and pump them out.

Bacterial colonies digest those digestible elements, the 'black' water drains off an soaks into the ground.

There are a number of products advertised and sold claiming to increase the life and performance of a septic system.  Most are actually designed to separate you from your money.  A couple packets of yeast from your kitchen may do just as well.

Systems are sized by estimating average usage daily of a household family.  Those homes with only one or two persons will last far longer than the same system used by many more people.  I don't doubt a designed service life in excess of 20 years at full capacity.  We would have to ask a County Engineer what is building code in our area.

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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #5 on: April 27, 2016, 10:15:12 AM »

Anyone have any idea what the impact would be of pouring off the drain bag contents into the woods?  Would "nature" appreciate the raw materials, too?
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #6 on: April 28, 2016, 04:31:25 AM »


lol

sort of reminds me of an old question.  "Does a Bear P in the woods?"

Other than an elevated sugar and protein the drain waste is quite similar to urine.   Some plants would trive on it.  You would have to ask an arborist which.   On a grand scale I would think it barely noticable, especially if you veried the spot in a wider pattern instead of just one spot.

The biggest problem may be carrying the volume out to the woods.   Manual drains not so much but my morning Cycler drain gets heavy.
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #7 on: April 28, 2016, 05:38:41 AM »

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The biggest problem may be carrying the volume out to the woods.   Manual drains not so much but my morning Cycler drain gets heavy.

I do live in the woods, so they are right off my front deck.  But you're right.  Getting it there and aiming it would be a challenge.  Here's hoping my drain line (with extension) reaches my bathroom.

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Charlie B53
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« Reply #8 on: April 28, 2016, 11:22:08 AM »


I've often thought in good weather of leaving the bedroom window open and running the drain line extension out.  Tie it to something so I know it will stay there and feed the rosebush and the flowers. just go move it a little every day or so.


Winter could be more of a problem.
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #9 on: April 28, 2016, 01:30:07 PM »

Unfortunately, my bedroom windows open out to a wooded ravine, and the only way to move the tubing around would be to climb out my window.  I think I'll pray hard for the toilet.
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #10 on: April 29, 2016, 06:10:53 AM »


We can find a solution to most everything.

Find a object with a hole through it like the lug nut from a semi-truck.  Pas the hose thru it a couple of times so it sort of clings to it well enough not to slip off.  Link a couple of drain extension hoses together to give you enough 'reach'.  Toss the weighted hose out the window off to one side,  in a few days pull it back and toss it off to the other side, middle, half left, etc..

Fine for fair weather months.  If I were there I could make it work most all year.  I love a slightly open window all winter.  Only be a problem if the drain froze up and the machine would alarm.

Have a second set of drain hose ready to toss if that happens.  Pull the frozen back and lay it in the bathtub to thaw when the other one freezes.
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beckums70
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« Reply #11 on: May 28, 2016, 07:34:06 AM »

I do a lot of camping.  Trust me, you don't want to drain your line outside on the ground.

First of all, the used dialysate stinks to high heaven, so the more soaked the ground gets and the hotter it is outside, the worse the smell.

Secondly, the smell attracts critters.  All kinds of critters, from bugs to raccoons to snakes.  I use drain bags when camping and then either empty them out in the woods or , if in a campground with facilities, in the bathroom.  I suppose you could also empty them in a creek or even run your drain line to a creek if you wanted, but that seems kind of icky to me, since I like wading and my boy likes to swim in those places.
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Charlie B53
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« Reply #12 on: May 28, 2016, 07:58:12 PM »


When fishing I wouldn't P in the creek.  Walk up the bank a ways into the trees.  At least the ground might filter out most the stuff before the water makes it way into the creek.
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