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Author Topic: The dangerous effect of phosphorus additives to renal patients & non renal patie  (Read 2049 times)
hatedialysis2
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« on: April 23, 2016, 12:44:59 PM »

Is this article saying that phosphorus additives which are much more highly absorbed than phosphorus found in non processed foods  the cause of kidney and other organ failure?

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"Phosphate occurs naturally in the form of organic esters in many kinds of food, including meat, potatoes, bread, and other farinaceous products; the consumption of such foods cannot be restricted without incurring the risk of lowering protein intake. Naturally occurring phosphate in food is organically bound, and only 40% to 60% of it is absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract (e1).

On the other hand, an avoidable risk to health that has not attracted sufficient attention to date arises from the increased use of phosphate as a food additive and preservative. This “free” (not organically bound) phosphate is very effectively absorbed in the gastrointestinal tract. Typical foods with large amounts of added phosphate are processed meat, ham, sausages, canned fish, baked goods, cola drinks, and other soft drinks. Dietary counseling is all the more difficult because the phosphate content in food—and, in particular, the added phospate content—is not marked on the package.

It used to be thought that the only health risk posed by phosphate lay in the promotion of calcification in blood vessels and bodily organs. Recently, however, important discoveries have been made about the hormonal regulation of phosphate metabolism. It is now known that the serum phosphate concentration is controlled by two newly discovered factors called fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) and klotho; that phosphate causes lasting damage to the cardiovascular system, either by a direct mechanism or by way of these hormonal factors; and that phosphate accelerates aging processes in animal models (e2, e3).

In particular, phosphate added to animal fodder accelerates age-related organ complications such as muscle and skin atrophy, the progression of chronic renal failure, and cardiovascular calcifications (e2). "

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3278747/
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Fabkiwi06
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2016, 02:27:06 PM »

It makes sense. I know that my dietician has told me that it's better to have phosphorus in naturally occurring forms as opposed to preservative forms (ie... cheese is a better choice than a diet coke) because your body can break it down better. Something to do with the additional minerals that can bind to the phosphorus and help it pass through your system easier.
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kickingandscreaming
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« Reply #2 on: April 23, 2016, 02:48:14 PM »

A lot of naturally occurring phosphorus--especially in vegetable foods-- is bound by phytates.  From most nutritional perspectives these are considered "bad" because they are anti-nutrients and prevent the body from accessing them.  For us, however, the opposite might be true, i.e. we can eat them without worrying so much. 

A while ago I posted a new food pyramid from Italy that says we should eat beans daily.  And it also talks about availability:
Quote
Shift from phosphorus-rich foods to low phosphorus foods. Take into consideration bioavailability. Plant foods contain phosphorus but less than half of the mineral content is absorbed by the body. The phosphoric acid in soft drinks, by comparison, is almost completely absorbed.
    Boil foods to reduce their mineral content, including phosphorus (then discard the water). According to one study, boiling reduces phosphorus by 51% for vegetables, 48% for legumes, and 38% for meats.
    Try to identify and avoid phosphate additives. Processed foods contain considerable amounts of added phosphorus, including from preservatives.
http://ihatedialysis.com/forum/index.php?topic=32929.0

One of the most eye-opening things to me was learning that baking powder is largely phosphorus, so practically any commercial baked goods contains it and is suspect.  You can make your own baking powder from baking soda and citric acid.  No phosphorus.  I try to totally stay away from processed foods.  Personally, I don't trust most foods that come from our Food-Industrial Complex.  I do all my own cooking from scratch.  Then I know what's in it.
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hatedialysis2
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« Reply #3 on: April 23, 2016, 04:58:52 PM »

A lot of naturally occurring phosphorus--especially in vegetable foods-- is bound by phytates.  From most nutritional perspectives these are considered "bad" because they are anti-nutrients and prevent the body from accessing them.  For us, however, the opposite might be true, i.e. we can eat them without worrying so much. 

A while ago I posted a new food pyramid from Italy that says we should eat beans daily.  And it also talks about availability:
Quote
Shift from phosphorus-rich foods to low phosphorus foods. Take into consideration bioavailability. Plant foods contain phosphorus but less than half of the mineral content is absorbed by the body. The phosphoric acid in soft drinks, by comparison, is almost completely absorbed.
    Boil foods to reduce their mineral content, including phosphorus (then discard the water). According to one study, boiling reduces phosphorus by 51% for vegetables, 48% for legumes, and 38% for meats.
    Try to identify and avoid phosphate additives. Processed foods contain considerable amounts of added phosphorus, including from preservatives.
http://ihatedialysis.com/forum/index.php?topic=32929.0


One of the most eye-opening things to me was learning that baking powder is largely phosphorus, so practically any commercial baked goods contains it and is suspect.  You can make your own baking powder from baking soda and citric acid.  No phosphorus.  I try to totally stay away from processed foods.  Personally, I don't trust most foods that come from our Food-Industrial Complex.  I do all my own cooking from scratch.  Then I know what's in it.

Phytic acid inteferes wth the absorption of iron, and other nutrients in the meal your eating so if your eating toast with salad then it will intefere with the avbsortion of the nutrients in both the toast and salad.   Phytates are found in grains, legumes, seeds, nuts. ( I know I'm leaving something out). For beans the best way to disarm the protective function of the phytates is to soak your grains,  beans, and other phytates containing food in water for 24 hours before cooking them or using them.   For grains , you can buy them sprouted if your willing to pay for it.   

You are absolutely right about preparing everything at home, I make my own cheeses, breads, crackers...    I was just so disappointed to find that you can't let your guard down even in an expensive health food store.  You got to check the labels on everything even if it says organic.
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