I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
May 26, 2017, 09:12:52 PM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
512558 Posts in 31979 Topics by 11484 Members
Latest Member: Cochranme
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Off-Topic
| |-+  Diabetes (Moderator: Vt Big Rig)
| | |-+  Wacked out sugars and Pain
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] Go Down Print
Author Topic: Wacked out sugars and Pain  (Read 1792 times)
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2278


« on: May 15, 2014, 11:07:19 AM »


I've been on PD almost a year now. Started the last week of May.  About November my PCP said my sugars have risen beyond my usual borderline and I'm now considered a diabetic.  The Gloco pills didn't do a thing.  Started Lantnus at night, have steadily been increasing and now at 35 units.  I don't think it is enough.

Two weeks ago they gave me a box of Novalog fast acting pens and told me to start at 5/5/8.  Well, it's more like 15/20/25

I suspect I an maybe a little bit insulin resistant, and/ or the constant pain from all the joint and muscle damage from permanent injuries, the pain is also driving up my sugars.

35 units of Lantus at 10 pm, midnight to 1 I test and get a 115.  OK fine, I think.

7 am I test and get 170

NOTHING to eat or drink since 6 pm the night before!    What's going on?    I drink a small glass of tap water with my meds, NOTHING with any calories.

I' read a few of the on-line sites and see some of their rules of 500, or something like that.  And methods of figuring an insulin to carb ratio.

It doesn't work for me.

Granted I am getting carbs from the PD solution.  I use 2 1/2% bags three times and the nightly change I use Ico, which isn't supposed to affect my sugars.  They gave me aOne Touch Ultra Mini as some of the other brands testers can give a false high reading because of the Ico.  I have a Med Alert braclet and necklace because of this so EMS doesn't hit me with an excessive dose of insulin should they ever test me with the wrong meter.

I send notes to my PCP, Renal team, and my Endo Diabetic Nurse complaining about all this, they so far haven't answered.

I didn't have these problems prior to the 80's as I usually kept myself 'comfortably numb'.  But I've been clean since 81, and it is getting very difficult to cope.

I am thinking of asking for admission until they stick a fentenyl patch on me.  I am beginning to believe that is the only thing that is going to work.

Thanks for letting me vent.

Take Care All,

Charlie B
Logged
trenton6013
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 42

« Reply #1 on: January 01, 2017, 10:03:42 AM »

wow, and I thought having both diabetes type 1 and kidney failure was so bad.  It's been a struggle to follow both the diabetic and renal diet.  Fortunately I haven't had to inject myself with that much insulin but like you, I use the humalog for fast acting in a pen and I do 8 units of Lantus at bedtime with a pen.  I just need to focus on portion control because I like to eat a lot of protein and since they told me I can eat white rice and white bread, it's difficult to keep the portions low.  But since having diabetes, it pushes back my transplant another 3-5 years.  Been on hemo for 3 years already. So I'm there with you about dealing with diabetes AND kidney failure and having to deal with keeping my sugars stable, having medicare pay for my diabetic supplies which can get costly with the test strips and even buying them from amazon doesn't really save you a lot in the long run
Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1649


« Reply #2 on: January 01, 2017, 12:36:18 PM »

The cost of diabetic supplies is outrageous. Even with private pay insurance. Especially test strips and syringes (while in some cities, heroin addicts get their syringes free from taxpayers like my husband). My husband's insurance doesn't pay for Lantus anymore so he gets Humalog R and Humalog N from Walmart. He will/should have Medicare as his primary pretty soon, will be interesting how much his supplies are going to cost.   
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
trenton6013
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 42

« Reply #3 on: January 01, 2017, 08:53:27 PM »

if he can get medicare part D, then the costs won't be so bad.  I have medicare part D so I don't pay often out of pocket.  I get most of my meds and medical supplies through Davita Pharmacy
Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1649


« Reply #4 on: January 01, 2017, 10:47:52 PM »

if he can get medicare part D, then the costs won't be so bad.  I have medicare part D so I don't pay often out of pocket.  I get most of my meds and medical supplies through Davita Pharmacy

Thanks for the tip. He uses Fresenius. I will let him know. Maybe he can get the supplies from their specialty pharmacy.
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2278


« Reply #5 on: January 02, 2017, 05:46:26 AM »


Hi PrimeTimer,

This old thread really does need an update.

Part D med insurance can be a great thing.  I had a policy witih Humana that many of the maintenance meds were available with a ZERO co-pay for a 90 day refill by mail.  For me that was only $18 monthly and saved me a bundle.   Sadly, I did have to cancel.  Med changes by Dr and Humana's list of 'covered' meds dropped me to only one med available for free.  I went back to getting everything from the VA.

I was VERY insulin resistant when I began.  Over the first two years both on PD and Diabetic I lost most of my appetite due to the constant pressure of carrying PD fluid.  I lost just over 100 pounds.  As the weight came off my insulin resistance went away and I had to start reducing both my Lantus and fast-acting.  Now at 220 pounds I am only using 20 to 25 units of Lantus, and only rarely need any fast-acting.

I am trying hard to stay within reasonable diet guidelines and that helps a lot.  I do splurge once in a while, we do have to treat ourselves occasionally.  Just not very often.

Hope this helps.
Logged
PrimeTimer
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1649


« Reply #6 on: January 02, 2017, 10:38:33 AM »

Since starting dialysis 3 yrs ago and losing weight my husband has also needed less insulin. He checks his blood sugar level several times a day and particularly before eating. He goes thru a lot of test strips but has to in order to know how much insulin to take. Sometimes he overshoots and takes too much insulin and then finds himself having to grab something sugary to eat or take glucose tablets. Sometimes his blood sugar level will go so low it will actually wake him up in the middle of the night and off he runs to the kitchen. He says a low blood sugar level crash feels worse to deal with than high blood sugar except that high blood sugar levels interfere with healing and for a diabetic, that can be deadly, thus, why you see some diabetics that have had amputations. One tiny little sore on the bottom of a foot can end up infecting the inside of an entire leg bone. He has actually met other diabetics who are afraid of injecting themselves with insulin and end up having a leg amputated and they STILL refuse to take insulin. He says they come in at his center for dialysis in a wheelchair missing their feet or legs and still do not understand the importance of taking insulin. It's very sad but I do not understand why no one has been able to get these people on insulin. I worked with a young man who refused to take insulin and he actually applauded his own grandfather for "staying strong" after he had his legs amputated. He said his grandfather didn't let it get him down. Well, that's great but I still think my coworker should have been taking insulin to avoid amputations, diabetics are always at risk, even when they seemingly do everything right. This guy just laughed, saying he wanted to be tough like his grandfather. Bet his wife doesn't feel that way.
Logged

Husband has ESRD with Type I Diabetes -Insulin Dependent.
I was his carepartner for home hemodialysis using Nxstage December 2013-July 2016.
He went back to doing in-center July 2016.
Charlie B53
Global Moderator
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2278


« Reply #7 on: January 02, 2017, 10:05:03 PM »


Sadly, a lady that used to work for me that has SEEN diabetus take her Mothers legs, refused to curb her eating.  Daily eating TWO complete McDonalds Big Pancake Breakfasts with bacon added.  Similar deal with lunch.  McD's, at least a double cheese, bacon added, and 2 large fries.  But she drank Diet Coke!

Refused to test, refused insulin.  It killed her before she could lose a leg.  Only 42.

I cannot understand some people.  It's like they have a death wish, but are not willing to commit suicide much quicker.

Like I should talk.   I still smoke.    That's a lot like the pot calling the kettle black.

Logged
trenton6013
Newbie
*
Offline Offline

Posts: 42

« Reply #8 on: January 04, 2017, 11:36:04 PM »

yeah it was bad news that the dialysis center I went to had a mcdonald's right across the street.  I never went in because I was always afraid of my potassium and phosphorous levels shooting up and then I'd have to be on more meds AND more days at the dialysis center.  It used to piss me off whenever they'd be making their french fries fresh and the smell just lingered inside the dialysis center
Logged
Pages: [1] Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.5 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines
Enotify by CreateAForum.com
Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!