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Author Topic: Drinking Soda and CKD?  (Read 10073 times)
beachbum
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« on: May 10, 2011, 10:21:39 PM »

I have a question. I was told soda isn't good for a kidney patient because it will raise your phosphorus levels but this isn't true is it? What I mean is darker sodas contain phosphoric acid, but lighter sodas generally don't. My kidney doctor didn't tell me this. So is it safe to drink soda in moderation that doesn't contain phosphoric acid? I've also had issues with gout and it seems like I get worse flare-ups after drinking too much soda.
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cytoxin
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« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2011, 12:08:53 AM »

If by lighter soda's you mean things like Ginger Ale, Sprite, Fanta, then yes, they do contain lower amounts of Phosphor then the darker kind (Pepsi, Coke, Dr Pepper...).  Oddly enough, Root beer is usually listed as being low in Phosphor too.  You should be able to obtain a list of beverages and their phosphor content from your Dialysis Nurse.

Generally speaking, soda's are pretty empty nutritionally so you don't want them to be your beverage of choice, but a little every now and then of the lower phosphor ones won't hurt.

And also be aware it isn't just sodas that are loaded with Ph, lots of other drinks you wouldn't think of are also high in it (Gatorades, Hawaiian Punch, certain tea's)
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« Reply #2 on: May 11, 2011, 02:10:56 AM »

Not sure if it is te diet sodas only, but potassium also is a consideration when levels are more than usual. One diet soda I drink has 3 different forms of potassium ingriedents.
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« Reply #3 on: May 11, 2011, 06:32:56 AM »

Blokey was told to steer clear of Coke Zero (the only coke he likes), but he treats himself to a can every other day.  His levels don't seem to be affected by it. 

However, his levels were affected when he started drinking too much coffee at work so now he's drinking tea instead, so this

... lots of other drinks you wouldn't think of are also high in it ... certain teas

is frustrating. *sigh*
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cath-hater
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« Reply #4 on: May 11, 2011, 09:34:05 AM »

I agree with cytoxin and told the same from my dietician.  Stay away from darker sodas, but root beer is okay.  I usually have an occasional sprite/7-up/sierra mist now and then.  Sometimes I just crave that carbonation and just have to drink a soda.
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beachbum
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« Reply #5 on: May 11, 2011, 09:45:09 AM »

And also be aware it isn't just sodas that are loaded with Ph, lots of other drinks you wouldn't think of are also high in it (Gatorades, Hawaiian Punch, certain tea's)

Oh yeah, I forgot about Gatorade. I was craving a soda one night and bought a Gatorade instead thinking I was sticking to my diet and then I read the ingredients.
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Zach
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« Reply #6 on: May 11, 2011, 10:52:45 AM »

These days you can find phosphorus in colas as well as non-cola sodas.
Caramel coloring (dark color) has nothing to do with it.

Look for phosphoric acid in the ingredients.

I bought a bottle of tonic water the other day (clear, no color), and it turned out to have phosphoric acid.

Phosphoric acid is becoming more widely used today to provide a tangy or sour taste in all sorts of bottled drinks (including some protein drinks), whereas in the past citric acid (more expensive) was used to produce that flavoring.

 8)
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beachbum
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« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2011, 05:05:23 AM »

These days you can find phosphorus in colas as well as non-cola sodas.
Caramel coloring (dark color) has nothing to do with it.

Look for phosphoric acid in the ingredients.

I bought a bottle of tonic water the other day (clear, no color), and it turned out to have phosphoric acid.

Phosphoric acid is becoming more widely used today to provide a tangy or sour taste in all sorts of bottled drinks (including some protein drinks), whereas in the past citric acid (more expensive) was used to produce that flavoring.

 8)

Wow. I didn't know that. It sucks that these beverage companies put their bottom-line first before their customers' health. Kidney patients should avoid this stuff but even healthy people as well. Soda consumption is a big part of the diabetes epidemic. I'll just try to stick to water as much as possible.
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Stoday
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« Reply #8 on: May 12, 2011, 09:44:07 PM »

The USDA publish lists of phosphorous and potassium contents of foods.

Fizzy drinks that have no phosphate content include: soda, ginger ale, grape soda, root beer, Sprite. Orange is low.
High phosphate are cola, low calorie cola and pepper-type cola.

As for potassium, all the fizzy drinks including colas are low except for low calorie colas.
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cytoxin
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« Reply #9 on: May 12, 2011, 11:16:06 PM »

  Stay away from darker sodas, but root beer is okay.

Important to remember that it is just certain brands of root beer that are low, not all.  Double check the labels to be sure. 

I believe that Hires Root Beer has content of 22.4, while A&W contains 3. While Coke: 69.0 and Pepsi 57.2
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sullidog
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« Reply #10 on: May 13, 2011, 08:47:44 PM »

also gatorade has high potassium
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« Reply #11 on: May 15, 2011, 04:08:51 AM »

Well, and her I was about to say I've got past most soda's (soft drinks here in Oz) but recommend Tonic Water because of its Quinine content and consequent value in helping with cramp.
These days I'm soda free, but love my fresh squeezed orange juce.
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Zach
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« Reply #12 on: May 15, 2011, 05:08:54 PM »


Well, and her I was about to say I've got past most soda's (soft drinks here in Oz) but recommend Tonic Water because of its Quinine content and consequent value in helping with cramp.
These days I'm soda free, but love my fresh squeezed orange juce.


Some makers of tonic water do not yet use phosphoric acid in their recipe.
But recipes change.

Always check the ingredients label to be sure.

8)
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Work full time.  I make films.

Just the facts: 75 kgs. (about 165 lbs.)
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600 dialysate flow (Qd)  ~400 blood pump (Qb)
Fresenius Optiflux-180 filter--without reuse
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« Reply #13 on: May 27, 2011, 02:50:47 PM »


"Important to remember that it is just certain brands of root beer that are low, not all.  Double check the labels to be sure. 
I believe that Hires Root Beer has content of 22.4, while A&W contains 3. While Coke: 69.0 and Pepsi 57.2"


Diet Mug Root Beer-000  :2thumbsup;
« Last Edit: May 27, 2011, 02:52:21 PM by kamar55 » Logged

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« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2011, 03:10:16 AM »

This is interesting. Full sugar non cola fizzy drinks are on Dh's recommended list from the dietician, he has no fluid restriction but trouble getting enough calories.
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« Reply #15 on: June 04, 2011, 02:56:18 PM »

Prior to emergency dialysis, I was a once a day iced tea drinker and drank a can of coke everyday. Since I started with the "Renal diet" with lower phosphate last summer, I have lost 60 pounds!!! :thumbup; :2thumbsup; :clap; I went cold turkey on these two drinks. I think back now how much I've cut back the carbs and I feel better for it :2thumbsup;
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« Reply #16 on: June 04, 2011, 03:20:40 PM »

I have a question. I was told soda isn't good for a kidney patient because it will raise your phosphorus levels but this isn't true is it? What I mean is darker sodas contain phosphoric acid, but lighter sodas generally don't. My kidney doctor didn't tell me this. So is it safe to drink soda in moderation that doesn't contain phosphoric acid? I've also had issues with gout and it seems like I get worse flare-ups after drinking too much soda.

Yes, dark colas have phosphorus in them, but  most foods out there does.... It is all about moderation and control.  A 12 oz coke or pepsi etc.. has approx 45 milligrams of phosphorus... In a days diet, that is not alot as long as you dont go over your recommended limit.
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« Reply #17 on: June 28, 2011, 03:37:53 PM »

My brother is just 1 month new to dialysis, and he  has yet to get any education about diet. Do the nurses or the dialysis clinic usually give you this info?   ???
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MooseMom
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« Reply #18 on: June 28, 2011, 03:47:17 PM »

My brother is just 1 month new to dialysis, and he  has yet to get any education about diet. Do the nurses or the dialysis clinic usually give you this info?   ???

Most clinics should have a renal dietician on staff to educate a patient about the renal/dialysis diet.  I am shocked that no one has yet spoken to your brother about this.  Perhaps his labs are so good that he doesn't need to watch what he eats, but I find that hard to believe, especially if he is on thrice weekly incenter dialysis.

Davita's website has good general info about dialysis and diet.  It's important to remember that the renal diet is not ONLY about what to avoid, etc, rather, it is also about how to maintain a good nutritional status.

Please have your brother ask for dietary advice.
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sillygirl1717
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« Reply #19 on: June 28, 2011, 07:08:18 PM »

They just took labs a week ago and have not told him anything yet.  I have a client of mine (I am the sister ) who is on dialysis and she said that she gets a report once a month telling her how her labs are, but so far my brother has received none.  Since he is type 1 diabetic he needs  diabetic diet, cardiac diet and also renal diet, we do feel in great need of direction. I will ask him tonight when he gets home if he has found any new info out to help with his diet. I am going with him on Thursday and will be observing and also being as nice as I can, but wanting to get some answers.  This first month has been hell to say the least.  I am wondering if we might need to change dialysis locations??   Thanks so much for the feed back, this site is saving my sanity. I hope that I can get my brother a little more interested in  IHD because he has so many questions and this is so helpful... :2thumbsup;
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« Reply #20 on: June 28, 2011, 09:52:30 PM »

If you get to meet the dietician, ask if she is familiar with diabetic renal diets, or is willing to make an appointment with you and your brother to help learn and adapt the renal diet to conform with a diabetic and cardiac diet. With the 2 clinics I had been thru, the dietician was not there all the time, only on certain days and times of the month. I did not get lab reports often either, but when I did it was just a useless smiley or frown face report, not actual numbers for easier understanding. After a month tho, I find it as lack of care. If you do not get any headway, time to find a different center and make your/ his concerns be known before switching.
 
Good Luck
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Diabetes -  age 7

Neuropathy in legs age 10

Eye impairments and blindness in one eye began in 95, major one during visit to the Indy 500 race of that year
   -glaucoma and surgery for that
     -cataract surgery twice on same eye (2000 - 2002). another one growing in good eye
     - vitrectomy in good eye post tx November 2003, totally blind for 4 months due to complications with meds and infection

Diagnosed with ESRD June 29, 1999
1st Dialysis - July 4, 1999
Last Dialysis - December 2, 2000

Kidney and Pancreas Transplant - December 3, 2000

Cataract Surgery on good eye - June 24, 2009
Knee Surgery 2010
2011/2012 in process of getting a guide dog
Guide Dog Training begins July 2, 2012 in NY
Guide Dog by end of July 2012
Next eye surgery late 2012 or 2013 if I feel like it
Home with Guide dog - July 27, 2012
Knee Surgery #2 - Oct 15, 2012
Eye Surgery - Nov 2012
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« Reply #21 on: June 28, 2011, 09:59:03 PM »

sillygirl, you can google "dialysis diet" and see that there are general rules to follow.  Generally, non-functioning kidney lead to a myriad of problems, but the two that are most affected by diet is the buildup of potassium and phosphorus.  These are both made of molecules that are too big to removed easily by dialysis (particularly phosphorus).  Too much potassium in the blood leads to dysfunction in the electrical current that powers the heart (actually, too little potassium will do the same thing), and too much phosphorus leads to calcification of tissues and blood vessels.

Since your brother is diabetic, the dietary advice he receives will need to be very well tailored to his specific needs.  And if he has cardiac problems, it is absolutely crucial that he enlist the help of a qualified renal dietician.  Truly, I am extremely concerned that he has been offered no guidance in this regard.  I'm also very concerned that he has not even been given his lab results.  That's just unheard of.

I am very glad that you are going with him on Thursday to get some answers.  I think it is possible that your brother may not be paying attention or may not be understanding the information he has been given, or maybe he can't remember it well enough to inform you.  It is never ideal getting medical information second hand, so good for you for taking the initiative and getting to the bottom of this.  But I can assure you that dietary advice is ALWAYS to be given (in fact, most patients are constantly being nagged by their renal dieticians to lay off the ice cream or some such thing!) and that lab results are always shared with patients so that they can see if their diet/meds/dialysis needs to be adjusted.

Please let us know what you find out on Thursday.  I'm really baffled by the dearth of information provided to you and your brother.  Something is not right.
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« Reply #22 on: July 03, 2011, 12:51:35 AM »

To be fair to dieticians, I think you need to be on dialysis and have some blood tests to see how your system is handling dialysis. The point being that what a dietician might recommend pre-dialysis and after dialysis commencement are two different things.
Each person reacts differently to dialysis and the bloodwork, taken weekly at my clinic, is relayed back the same day by the nurses who tell you the amendments you need to make on a weekly basis. This weekly advice supercedes anything the dietician gave you in the early stages before your clinical picture became clear.
And the advice can be crucial, eg most are asked to cut back on potassium rich foods, but some (like me) are asked to boost their intake and some (to their delight) are asked to increase their protein intake...New York Steak, here I come.
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« Reply #23 on: July 10, 2011, 10:04:35 PM »

I was told to increase my protein too.  I remember the dietitian said that if it runs, swims, or flies, I was to eat it. *LOL*

getting back to sodas (or plain old pop as it's called here)  I did find a list at one time that gave the amount of phosphorus in each brand.  It actually ranked them from most to least.  I should look and see if I can find that list again
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« Reply #24 on: July 10, 2011, 10:35:10 PM »

To be fair to dieticians, I think you need to be on dialysis and have some blood tests to see how your system is handling dialysis. The point being that what a dietician might recommend pre-dialysis and after dialysis commencement are two different things.

This is absolutely true.  Pre-D patients are advised to cut back on protein, and that is generally not the same advice a dialyzor would receive.

And it is true that each patient has a different set of needs.  Most of us are told that we need to watch our sodium intake.  Well, my doc has me on EIGHT sodium bicarbonate tabs a day to combat acidosis; it never occurred to me that any doc would tell a patient to eat more salt!!
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