I Hate Dialysis Message Board
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
September 23, 2019, 03:07:27 AM

Login with username, password and session length
Search:     Advanced search
528708 Posts in 33238 Topics by 12317 Members
Latest Member: Caregivingsister
* Home Help Search Login Register
+  I Hate Dialysis Message Board
|-+  Dialysis Discussion
| |-+  Dialysis: General Discussion (Moderator: cassandra)
| | |-+  Movies depicting kidney failure/diaylsis
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic. « previous next »
Pages: [1] 2 3 Go Down Print
Author Topic: Movies depicting kidney failure/diaylsis  (Read 18355 times)
gothiclovemonkey
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1659


« on: November 21, 2014, 04:26:17 PM »

Has anyone seen a movie or show that actually depicts it realistically????
I just watched the new version of Steel Magnolias, with Queen Latifah, and its like the old one, they arent showing a fistula or graft, or cath,, its like... idk... just not realistic...that frustrates me a bit lol

Note to self - never ever watch that movie again. Holy crap was I bawling.
When my docs told my parents I cant get pregnant, I always assumed they meant I physically could not concieve a child.... Now, I know they meant I shouldnt... And of course, thats part of that movie, so It was a bawl fest. I hadnt seen the old one since i was really young, and had forgotten how emotional a movie it is, on its own... add to it that we have this to deal with... wow!



EDITED:  Moved from off topic to Dialysis Discussion - Rerun
« Last Edit: December 05, 2014, 10:02:24 AM by Rerun » Logged

"Imagine how important death must be to have a prerequisite such as life" Unknown
HemoDialysis since 2007
TX listed 8/1/11 inactive
LISTED ACTIVE! 11/14/11 !!!
Michael Murphy
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2026


« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2014, 05:00:07 PM »

The only time I remember Dialysis in a major Movie was the Star Trek IV The Voyage Home where the following scene took place.
First, “Bones” encounters an old woman on a gurney in the hallway and asks her a question:

McCoy: What’s the matter with you?

Patient: Kidney… dialysis.

McCoy: Dialysis?! What is this? The Dark Ages? Here! You swallow that and if you have any more problems, just call me!

Later, as the crew is escaping, McCoy encounters the woman again, who’s telling everybody that McCoy had given her some pills and she grew a new kidney.
That was the only movie that showed up when I googled Dialysis Portrayed in a Movie.
The funny thing is I remember the scene vividly and occasionally think about it while in dialysis,  all of a sudden I'll look around and laugh hearing Dr. Mccoy say what is this the dark ages.
Logged
goofball
Jr. Member
**
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 68


« Reply #2 on: November 22, 2014, 11:52:09 AM »

Well now there's "Dumb and Dumber To"  :Kit n Stik;
Logged

APKD - 47yr-old

Renal Diet Chef
gothiclovemonkey
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1659


« Reply #3 on: November 23, 2014, 08:50:29 AM »

Dumb and DUmber to has dialysis? oh dear...

Ive seen quite a few tv shows and movies that have something to do with kidney failure/dialysis, and id say out of all of them, i think ive only seen maybe ONE that actually showed it realistically... but then turned around and made the transplant thing seem like a freakin walk in the park.


Haha well at least in Star Trek, it makes sense to do that! That would be awesome. Someone get on that! :P

Now, im SURE that its not only kidney stuff that gets wrongly portrayed in film, but damn, its not like they couldnt very simply do a quick bit of research for their film.... when i do my writing i try to make it realistic, if i have something i dont know, i research it! not that hard!!
Logged

"Imagine how important death must be to have a prerequisite such as life" Unknown
HemoDialysis since 2007
TX listed 8/1/11 inactive
LISTED ACTIVE! 11/14/11 !!!
iolaire
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1697


« Reply #4 on: November 23, 2014, 11:39:34 AM »

Here you go, but still no still no needles:
Fixing Paco: Season 1, Episode 2 
Dreamy Dialysis Technician 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt2386782/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2
Episode  on youtube
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyROObPmejM

http://www.fixingpaco.org/
looks to be a sort of infomercial telanovela by a hospital in LA.
 
Paco Fuentes is a man with a full life. As a loving husband, father of four, and a handyman with a thriving business, Paco’s motto is always, “You broke it. I fix it!” But when his health begins to decline due to kidney failure, Paco must confront the disease that will change his life, and finally accept that he is now the one who needs to be fixed. Following the Fuentes family’s very real trials and tribulations in dealing with Paco’s illness, each episode of Fixing Paco educates dialysis patients and their families about the treatment option of kidney transplantation, living donation, and being proactive in healthcare. Shot in English and Spanish, Fixing Paco is a groundbreaking series that cuts through language barriers, delivering a message of hope, as Paco triumphs in battling his disease, and learns to live again.

 Fixing Paco was produced by The Mendez National Institute of Transplantation, in association with Celtino Entertainment, and was made possible by a generous grant from the UniHealth Foundation.
 
Logged

Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
JW77
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 202

WWW
« Reply #5 on: December 05, 2014, 07:45:10 AM »

John Q, American Film.. Not bad.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0251160/  OK thats a heart transplant one but still.

Koma  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0408970/plotsummary?ref_=tt_ov_pl

Thriller, but strangely one of my favourites.. Not for the faint hearted.



Unconditional

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unconditional_%28film%29

Kidney Thieves.. Short comedy:

http://www.casesensitivefilms.com/kidneythieves/

Logged

Creator of London Kidney Social: https://www.facebook.com/groups/LondonKidneySocial/

Medical stuff, includes 3 kidneys, cancer, meningitis, 1 heart attack and its long and not that interesting! Maybe one day I'll write a book.! `

I have an eclectic taste in music, I fly kites, I read, write, tog, blog and have a bit of a passion for multicellular eukaryotes, and kites.

Founder of Kites4Kidneys - Start making your kites for WKD 2015..
https://www.facebook.com/kites4kidneys
Simon Dog
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3194


« Reply #6 on: December 05, 2014, 03:07:34 PM »

Awake
Logged
jeannea
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1955

« Reply #7 on: December 05, 2014, 11:02:41 PM »

In the last season of ER, they had Noah Wyle's character on dialysis. They had him working and doing dialysis which works for some and not others. When they showed him getting dialysis, the machine was right, the chair was right, and the needles went in his lower arm. The room was dim which is wrong and he had no blanket. I know those are minor. I can't remember for sure but I think they got him a transplant right before ER ended it's series.

Steel Magnolias isn't very accurate. Instead of a fistula, they were using needles to "strengthen her veins" or something like that. Then when she collapsed into her coma, she grabbed herself in pain. But the pain wasn't in the right place and pain would only be a sign of failure if you ignored lots of other stuff first. Unless we are to think she has pancreatitis? That hurts like hell. She didn't seem to feel pain in the right place for that either. Then they kept her on vent in the coma way too long. She would have had a trach by then.

I haven't really seen accurate things on tv or movies. Partly, kidney disease is boring and goes on forever. They always need a transplant immediately and always get one. It's the nature of writing drama.
Logged
mamagemini
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 122


It's all me.

WWW
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2014, 12:11:18 AM »

The new show called The Red Band Society....a young adult was on dialysis and also had liver failure. he looked great. after dialysis he ran off to almost have sex with a young girl. what ??? when i get home all i want to do is sleep and keep my food down. the only way i would have energy is to drink diet mtn. dew....lol :)
Logged

FSGS/Nephrotic syndrome 2005
AV Fistula placed right arm inside elbow 4/2012
Started HD 9/7/2012
Started PD Oct 2015
gothiclovemonkey
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1659


« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2014, 04:16:03 AM »

im sure kids are a bit more resilient to this crap, but i imagine thats still not quite as realistic. Although, teen boy hormones... if presented with a chance to 'get some' i doubt much would stop them haha
Logged

"Imagine how important death must be to have a prerequisite such as life" Unknown
HemoDialysis since 2007
TX listed 8/1/11 inactive
LISTED ACTIVE! 11/14/11 !!!
rsudock
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1351


will of the healthy makes up the fate of the sick.

« Reply #10 on: December 09, 2014, 05:04:43 PM »

YEh Red Band Society show made NO mention of ESRD.  :Kit n Stik;
Logged

Born with autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease
1995 - AV Fistula placed
Dec 7, 1999 cadaver transplant saved me from childhood dialysis!
10 transplant years = spleenectomy, gall bladder removed, liver biopsy, bone marrow aspiration.
July 27, 2010 Started dialysis for the first time ever.
June 21, 2011 2nd kidney nonrelated living donor
September 2013 Liver Cancer tumor.
October 2013 Ablation of liver tumor.
Now scans every 3 months to watch for new tumors.
Now Status 7 on the wait list for a liver.
How about another decade of solid health?
BobN
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 312


WWW
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2014, 03:37:29 PM »

"Whose Life Is It Anyway"

Didn't get much press, but a pretty good movie.
Logged

www.bobnortham.com
Author of The ABC's of the Big D: My Life on Dialysis
Bob's Prescription for Living With Dialysis:
Follow Your Recommended Diet and Especially Watch Your Potassium, Phosphorous, and Fluid.
Stay Active - Find a Form of Exercise You Like and DO IT!!
Laugh Every Chance You Get.
PaulBC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 204


« Reply #12 on: April 24, 2015, 10:48:27 AM »

McCoy: Dialysis?! What is this? The Dark Ages? Here! You swallow that and if you have any more problems, just call me!

Thanks for mentioning this! I haven't seen that movie since it came out. It is one of the better original-series Star Trek films and deserves another viewing. Needless to say, I completely missed this. I might have noticed, but wouldn't have remembered.

And indeed, it is the Dark Ages. Why do you ask?
Logged
PaulBC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 204


« Reply #13 on: April 27, 2015, 10:00:59 AM »

I went ahead and watched Star Trek IV on DVD this weekend. It holds up pretty well after 29 years. It's the only one of the 6 original series films that captured the feel of the comedic episodes.

A couple of other comments. The woman in the dialysis scene has some kind of clear plastic canopy over her. Is that anything real? It doesn't make much sense to me, and has nothing to do with dialysis as far as I know. She is elderly and wearing an oxygen tube that is no longer needed after she calls out that she "grew a new kidney". Well, who knows what else was in McCoy's pill? However, it is doubtful the hospital would have identified the new kidney in that amount of time.

So much for nitpicking. McCoy had some other opinions of late 20th century medicine. He compares a discussion on chemotherapy with "The Spanish Inquisition" and tells the attending surgeon to put his "butcher knives" away when he (forcibly) takes over the care of Chekhov.

All very plausible for what a doctor visiting from the 23rd century might think of today's medical practices. Not to knock today's doctors, who are doing what they can with available technology.

On a more depressing note, I have to say that the 1986 hospital didn't look all that different than a hospital in 2015, despite how it might look to a visitor from 2286.
Logged
iolaire
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 1697


« Reply #14 on: April 27, 2015, 10:08:19 AM »

All very plausible for what a doctor visiting from the 23rd century might think of today's medical practices. Not to knock today's doctors, who are doing what they can with available technology.

I wonder every so often what treatments will be rendered pointless by the time we grow old.   It feels like there are all kinds of medical advances that we benefit from but you can be sure that not all of them will stand the test of time...  Remember there was a time when people who prompted hand washing before surgery were considered quacks...
Logged

Transplant July 2017 from out of state deceased donor, waited three weeks the creatine to fall into expected range, dialysis December 2013 - July 2017.

Well on dialysis I traveled a lot and posted about international trips in the Dialysis: Traveling Tips and Stories section.
PaulBC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 204


« Reply #15 on: April 27, 2015, 10:22:54 AM »

Another fictional reference to dialysis, but not a movie. In the MASH episode "A War for All Seasons" (1980) they build an improvised dialysis machine using sausage casings. That may even have been the first time I heard of dialysis, and it is something that stuck in my mind ever since.
Logged
Bill Peckham
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 3057


WWW
« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2015, 09:16:15 PM »

Another fictional reference to dialysis, but not a movie. In the MASH episode "A War for All Seasons" (1980) they build an improvised dialysis machine using sausage casings. That may even have been the first time I heard of dialysis, and it is something that stuck in my mind ever since.


Kolff used sausage casings to accomplish the first successful dialysis treatment - he built the first machine during WWII in occupied Holland (NY Times link). MASH episode : Plausible
Logged

http://www.billpeckham.com  "Dialysis from the sharp end of the needle" tracking  industry news and trends - in advocacy, reimbursement, politics and the provision of dialysis
Incenter Hemodialysis: 1990 - 2001
Home Hemodialysis: 2001 - Present
NxStage System One Cycler 2007 - Present
        * 4 to 6 days a week 30 Liters (using PureFlow) @ ~250 Qb ~ 8 hour per treatment FF~28
PaulBC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 204


« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2015, 10:18:42 PM »

Kolff used sausage casings to accomplish the first successful dialysis treatment - he built the first machine during WWII in occupied Holland (NY Times link). MASH episode : Plausible

MASH was one of my favorite shows, and I think they had a good research team. It's also an intriguing storyline, so no complaints.

If I find anything implausible, it's just that a small group of doctors could put one together in the middle of the Korean War (with parts from a Sears catalog). There may even be some precedent for that, but dialysis machines continued to be very rare through most of the 50s, and if that was possible, you'd think hospitals would be building them all over the place.
Logged
Michael Murphy
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 2026


« Reply #18 on: April 28, 2015, 01:10:27 AM »

No the FDA would have stopped them.  During the Vietnam war some medics were using a spray on super glue on wounds to control bleeding.  The FDA found out and had the military stop the use of the glue.
Logged
noahvale
Guest
« Reply #19 on: April 28, 2015, 05:13:56 AM »

^
« Last Edit: September 23, 2015, 08:51:45 AM by noahvale » Logged
Alex C.
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 164


« Reply #20 on: April 28, 2015, 06:31:03 AM »

I wouldn't expect that 'Hollywood' would consider dialysis as any sort of a plausibly interesting scene. Sitting on your @$$ for 4 hours in a harshly-lit medical facility? Good god, I can see people getting up to buy popcorn already......

Let's face it; dialysis may be scary, but for the most part, it's just plain DULL.
Logged
PaulBC
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Gender: Male
Posts: 204


« Reply #21 on: April 28, 2015, 09:22:46 AM »

I wouldn't expect that 'Hollywood' would consider dialysis as any sort of a plausibly interesting scene. Sitting on your @$$ for 4 hours in a harshly-lit medical facility? Good god, I can see people getting up to buy popcorn already......

Let's face it; dialysis may be scary, but for the most part, it's just plain DULL.

Well, it wouldn't have stopped Andy Warhol, who made an 8 hour movie of the Empire State Building. Warhol is not "Hollywood" I admit.

But I can imagine a movie like Norma Rae, Silkwood, or Erin Brockovich (not necessarily with a female protagonist, but it does seem to work out that way). There is plenty of drama both medical, and from the kidney industrial complex perspective. You wouldn't need a 4 hour long take of dialysis to convey the basic principle. There's also no excuse for getting it wrong when you can walk into a center in any populated area and see it firsthand.

Cancer gets a lot of attention in film. Trauma and heart disease show up as well. Transplants, yes there's John Q. I like Denzel Washington, but I can't really get on board with a protagonist who is threatening innocent lives to save one life. That kind of thing is just too much Hollywood. (added after edit: I realize he does not actually intend to kill any hostages).

I sometimes think kidney disease is the Rodney Dangerfield of life threatening conditions. I know how little I thought about kidneys before my personal brush with it. It is interesting to talk to people, and occasionally find out that they have a relative (usually older) on dialysis. This is not an unusual problem at all, but it is off the radar for most people.
« Last Edit: April 28, 2015, 09:36:42 AM by PaulBC » Logged
noahvale
Guest
« Reply #22 on: April 29, 2015, 10:59:24 PM »

^






« Last Edit: September 23, 2015, 08:50:14 AM by noahvale » Logged
gothiclovemonkey
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1659


« Reply #23 on: May 01, 2015, 05:43:16 AM »

ive noticed two things about talking about D on tv/movies.
its almost always, "I need a kidney or ill die" OR its BAM i got a kidney right now, after only knowing about it for a few days.
I saw one the other day (was it malcom in the middle? i think) that the lady who needed a kidney was called in by the dr, mid day, to get a kidney she didnt even want to have.... from her sister, who had it removed that morning.... that one made me LOL because wow...
as for the actual dialysis, they never ever mention needing fistulas/grafts/caths etc...
Logged

"Imagine how important death must be to have a prerequisite such as life" Unknown
HemoDialysis since 2007
TX listed 8/1/11 inactive
LISTED ACTIVE! 11/14/11 !!!
jeannea
Elite Member
*****
Offline Offline

Gender: Female
Posts: 1955

« Reply #24 on: May 02, 2015, 04:30:11 PM »

Fistulas aren't "pretty" enough for movies. You can only have perfectly placed interesting scars. Unless you're the bad guy.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 Go Up Print 
« previous next »
 

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP SMF 2.0.15 | SMF © 2017, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!